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CORBY ARRIVES HOME…LET THE CHAOS BEGIN


Like sands through the hour glass so are days of Schapelle Corby inc…. She will arrive back in Australia with as much controversy as she had the day she arrived in Bali longer than a decade ago. I still stand by the scenario her family was deep into the dope trade and a key link in Bali either let them down by not letting the weed through or that person was removed and stuffed up their nice little earner. The OLD mad in my view died gutless and said nothing…A true dog…Robbo

abc.net.au

Schapelle Corby arrives in Australia more than 12 years after drug trafficking conviction

By Patrick Williams and staff

Updated about an hour agoSun 28 May 2017, 6:02pm

Schapelle Corby has arrived home in Australia, touching down at Brisbane International Airport just after 5:00am, more than 12 years after she was convicted of taking marijuana into Bali.

Key points:

  • Schapelle Corby arrived at Brisbane International Airport about 5:00am
  • Mercedes Corby seen arriving at mother Rosleigh Rose’s house at Loganlea, south of Brisbane
  • Family spokeswoman asks for privacy as Corby readjusts to life back in Australia

Media and some of Corby’s supporters gathered at the airport from as early as 4:00am in anticipation of her return but she did not leave the terminal through the usual exit.

Instead, Corby and her sister Mercedes were taken off the plane first and whisked away in a black van with tinted windows, part of a larger convoy of eight vehicles.

Corby’s whereabouts are currently unknown as the convoy split up further down the Gateway Motorway.

Some of the vehicles went into Brisbane’s CBD while others continued on to the Gold Coast.

Corby’s security has since been spotted at the Sofitel in Brisbane where it is believed she is located.

Mercedes Corby arrived at her mother Rosleigh Rose’s house at Loganlea, south of Brisbane.

At Ms Rose’s house, one man was seen wearing a horror mask as he let people out of the property.

Spokeswoman for the family, Eleanor Whitman, said Corby’s “priority and focus” would now be on healing and moving forward.

“To all those in Australia and all those in Bali who have been there throughout this difficult journey, your support has not gone unnoticed,” she said.

“In the spirit of humility and the spirit of dignity, we ask all parties to show respect for the family’s privacy during this time.”

Corby and her sister arrived in Brisbane aboard Malindo Air flight OD157, not Virgin Australia as originally expected.

The flights arrived at roughly the same time, but the last-minute switch in Denpasar meant she did not share the plane with dozens of journalists who had booked on board.

In Brisbane, once it became clear Corby had left the airport unnoticed, one unidentified woman cheered.

“That’s the second time in 24 hours she’s fooled you,” she said referring to the media.

Corby was arrested in 2004 carrying more than 4 kilograms of marijuana in her boogie board bag and returns to Australia as a convicted drug trafficker who has served her jail time.

One of Corby’s key defences put forward by her legal team and supporters was that corrupt baggage handlers had placed the marijuana in her bag.

‘She was hiding her face, looked very nervous’

Brisbane man Tala Pauga, who was a passenger aboard OD157, said he recognised the Corby sisters as soon as he stepped on the plane.

“It’s like what you see on the media, that’s her face there,” he said.

Mr Pauga said the two were the first to be whisked off the plane once it landed in Brisbane.

Another passenger, Rowena Arias, said she was surprised to see Corby on her flight – who wore a scarf and had her head down in business class.

“She was hiding her face, looked very nervous,” she said.

Ms Arias said fellow travellers were told not to take photos of Corby.

Corby becomes overnight Instagram success

More than 200 police officers and private security guards made sure Corby was deported from Indonesia last night without a hitch.

There had been chaotic scenes as she negotiated her way to the Bali airport via the parole office where she signed forms guaranteeing her freedom.

She carried a bag with a picture of missing New South Wales boy William Tyrrell on the front, but the Where’s William campaign has distanced itself from Corby.

“While the Where’s William campaign appreciates that Schapelle Corby has shown concern regarding little William’s disappearance and in using her release as a convicted offender from Bali as a media opportunity to increase awareness that William is still missing, we are not happy,” a statement on the campaign’s Facebook page read.

“William’s family and their campaign to support the NSW Police in their investigation in the search for William have absolutely no association with Schapelle Corby, her supporters or her family and had no prior knowledge of Miss Corby’s intention to use William’s image in this way.”

Now Corby is back on Australian soil, she can speak freely but not for profit, with proceed of crime laws meaning she cannot sell her story.

The 39-year-old set up an Instagram account recently and began posting photos during her last hours in Bali.

She had tens of thousands of followers within hours, with the comments posted overwhelmingly supportive.

Topics: international-law, laws, law-crime-and-justice, drug-offences, crime, brisbane-4000, bali, australia

First posted earlier today at 5:16amSun 28 May 2017, 5:16am

Contact Patrick Williams

More stories from Queensland

corby with tyrell sticker.jpeg

https://www.instagram.com/schapelle.corby/

Thank god she was able to leave Bali quietly…NOT 27/05/2017

Schapelle Corby’s release from Bali and return to Australia

Large police entourage escort Corby to parole office

Cindy Wockner, Charles Miranda and Shaya Laughlin in BaliNews Corp Australia Network

CONVICTED drug smuggler Schapelle Corby has been told she is free to go after signing in at the Parole Board one last time, in a high-level police operation.

The final paper work for her release has been signed at the Parole Office in Denpasar. She is now a free woman.

Corby has begun her long-awaited journey to freedom, leaving her Kuta home amidst dramatic and chaotic scenes, where she was bundled into a car.

Dozens of police and media and surrounded Corby as she was taken out the gate of her home in Kuta and shoved into a waiting black car with her sister Mercedes.

She had a scarf around her head, wore dark sunglasses and carried a handbag with a picture of missing Australian boy William Tyrrell.

MORE: Schapelle Corby Instagrams her journey to freedom

Schapelle Corby leaves the Prosecutors office in Denpasar a free woman. Picture: Nathan Edwards

Schapelle Corby leaves the Prosecutors office in Denpasar a free woman. Picture: Nathan Edwards Source:News Corp Australia

Schapelle Corby leaves the Prosecutors office with police and Mercedes behind her. Picture: Nathan Edwards

Schapelle Corby leaves the Prosecutors office with police and Mercedes behind her. Picture: Nathan Edwards Source: News Corp Australia

Schapelle Corby leaves the Prosecutors office in Denpasar. Picture: Nathan Edwards

Schapelle Corby leaves the Prosecutors office in Denpasar. Picture: Nathan EdwardsSource: News Corp Australia

Schapelle Corby leaves while still covering her face with sunnies and a scarf. Picture: Nathan Edwards

Schapelle Corby leaves while still covering her face with sunnies and a scarf. Picture: Nathan Edwards Source:News Corp Australia

Tyrell disappeared at the age of three from Kendall, on the New South Wales mid-north coast in 2014.

Bemused locals and dozens of Australian tourists barely caught a glimpse of Corby amid the crush of cameras as her car snaked its way out her laneway, surrounded by police running on foot.

As part of the convoy there were two trucks, five police cars plus the vehicle transporting Corby. It was the first time Corby had been seen in public in 10 days.

The journey from her home to the parole board took about 40 mins aided by police stopping trafffic at major intersection.

Schapelle Corby getting into the van to got the the parole office. Picture: Channel Nine

Schapelle Corby getting into the van to got the the parole office. Picture: Channel NineSource: Supplied

Police securing Schapelle Corby (holding handbag) leaving the house in Kuta lane to go to Parole Board with a picture of William Tyrell on the bag. Picture: Lukman S. Bintoro

Police securing Schapelle Corby (holding handbag) leaving the house in Kuta lane to go to Parole Board with a picture of William Tyrell on the bag. Picture: Lukman S. BintoroSource: News Corp Australia

Shortly before 6pm Bali time, parole officials emerged from the office to hold up the freedom letter, telling her that her 15-year drug trafficking sentence was at an end.

It was the moment Corby has dreamed of for the past 12 years and eight months – the day, shortly before her 40th birthday, that she would no longer be a prisoner.

Schapelle Corby's freedom document. Picture: Supplied

Schapelle Corby’s freedom document. Picture: Supplied Source: Supplied

Corby entered the parole office, again shrouded by a scarf and spent about 40 minutes inside with officials, signing her paperwork and the all important freedom letter.

Earlier police had locked arms around the car to push back media as she left her home.

Corby’s brother Michael, wearing an old man mask, sat on the fence, taking photos of the scene.

Corby’s conviction and release from jail was chaotic and so was her release yesterday.

Before she left the home, Schapelle’s sister Mercedes told News Corporation; “Schapelle is holding up well”.

Police secure the car that take Schapelle Corby from the house to the Parole office in Denpasar, Bali. Picture: Lukman S. Bintoro

Police secure the car that take Schapelle Corby from the house to the Parole Office in Denpasar, Bali. Picture: Lukman S. Bintoro Source: News Corp Australia

Michael Corby wearing a mask photographs media just before Schapelle Corby leaves her home in Kuta. Picture Supplied

Michael Corby wearing a mask photographs media just before Schapelle Corby leaves her home in Kuta. Picture Supplied Source: Supplied

And, finding her voice for the first time, Corby broke her three-year public silence and created a brand new Instagram account. Her first post was a photograph of her two beloved dogs, Luna and May, with the comment: “Going to miss these two. My puppies #Luna&May”.

Within minutes of News Corporation revealing the Instagram account, Corby had thousands of followers.

Police secure the car that take Schapelle Corby from the house to the Parole office in Denpasar, Bali. Picture: Lukman S. Bintoro

Police secure the car that take Schapelle Corby from the house to the Parole office in Denpasar, Bali. Picture: Lukman S. BintoroSource: News Corp Australia

Schapelle Corby leaves her home in Bali before being deported. Picture: Channel Seven

Schapelle Corby leaves her home in Bali before being deported. Picture: Channel Seven Source: Supplied

And whilst Bali’s Governor Made Mangku Pastika and local parliament members instructed officials not to give Corby any special treatment, yesterday’s scenes showed it was the opposite.

More than 100 police were involved, four police cars lead and shadowed her convoy from home to the parole office to the airport, dramatic rehearsals were held earlier in the day.

“Today Corby is free,” Surung Pasaribu, the Corrections chief at Bali’s Law and Human Rights Ministry announced with some enthusiasm shortly before the show started.

“Since midnight she was free, I think there is no problem.”

Corby en route to parole office

On the issue of Corby’s new Instagram, Mr Pasaribu said it was no problem.

“I don’t think it is a problem, but I don’t follow Instagram and I don’t really understand this Instagram even on my proper mobile phone I don’t have it,” he said.

He said the overwhelming response by authorities for Corby was at the behest of the Australian Government in Bali.

Governor Pastika also said that her safety must be protected at all times during her departure from Bali tonight.

Police arrive at the home of Schapelle Corby before her deportation. Picture: Channel Seven

Police arrive at the home of Schapelle Corby before her deportation. Picture: Channel Seven Source: Supplied

It comes as more than 50 police, with tactical vans, sirens blaring and whistles blowing, conducted a dramatic rehearsal at Bali’s parole board yesterday.

Police also arrived at the laneway near her Kuta home to conduct a check. The actions in tthe lead up to her release gave a very strong impression that this was a special case.

News Corp Australia has obtained a copy of the notes from a special high level meeting held yesterday to discuss plans for Corby’s release.

Police arrive at the home of Schapelle Corby before her deportation. Picture: Channel Seven

Police arrive at the home of Schapelle Corby before her deportation. Picture: Channel SevenS ource: Supplied

The head of Bali’s Law and Human Rights Ministry, Ida Bagus Ketut Adnyana, this week briefed the Governor and members of the legislative assembly. He told yesterday’s meeting that the the Governor and parliament members had urged there be no impression that Corby is getting any special treatment.

“Although the direction from Bali Governor is that the deportation should run normally, but safety must be maintained as she was an ex drug convict that has become a highlight in her country, and it is not impossible she become a target of drug syndicate,” Governor Pastika said.

And the plans are that when Corby leaves the parole offices, the convoy of cars taking her to the airport does not drive fast, for reasons of safety and also in order to reduce the time she will need to wait at the airport for her flight home. An ambulance will shadow the convoy.

Surung Pasaribu, head of corrections, talks to media at the Bali Parole Office in Denpasar. Picture: Nathan Edwards

Surung Pasaribu, head of corrections, talks to media at the Bali Parole Office in Denpasar. Picture: Nathan Edwards Source:News Corp Australia

SCHAPELLE JOINS INSTAGRAM

Schapelle Corby has today created her own public Instagram account — which has more than 40,000 followers.

She wrote her fourth post — a selfie with her sister, as she approached the airport, writing: “Almost at the airport with my @mercedescorby.”

Selfie of Schapelle Corby and her sister Mercedes in the car on the way to the airport before being deported. Picture: Instagram

Selfie of Schapelle Corby and her sister Mercedes in the car on the way to the airport before being deported. Picture: InstagramSource:Instagram

She wrote her third post as she approached the parole office, writing: “Good bye to this parole paper work. Approching parole office for the last time.”

Schapelle Corby’s third post from her new account. Picture: Instagram

Schapelle Corby’s third post from her new account. Picture: InstagramSource:Instagram

Her second post shows her “Bali family” who she has thanked.

Second Instagram post from Schapelle Corby's instagram account. Picture: Instagram

Second Instagram post from Schapelle Corby’s instagram account. Picture: Instagram Source:Instagram

Her first post, as she remained holed up in her Kuta home counting down the final hours to freedom, was a photo of her two beloved dogs, Luna and May.

Schapelle wrote: “Going to miss these two. My puppies #Luna&May”.

Instagram page set up by Schapelle Corby today before her release. Picture: Instagram/Schapelle Corby

Instagram page set up by Schapelle Corby today before her release. Picture: Instagram/Schapelle CorbySource:Instagram

Among those making comments on the account was her sister Mercedes, who is with her inside the home now and will accompany her on her final journey home.

‘WE HOPE SHE DOESN’T REPEAT THIS’

Surung Pasaribu, chief of the correctional department of the Law and Human Rights Ministry, said the overwhelming response by authorities for Corby was at the behest of the Australian Government in Bali.

“The consulate general said to us, ‘Please save my citizen’, so security is Indonesia’s responsibility to secure her to the airport so we will protect her for this while she in this country,” he said, adding “it was not special, just duty”.

“We just hope she doesn’t repeat this (drug smuggling) again and God also wants human beings doing mistakes to come back to the right path.”

He said he thought Corby was different to other prisoners staying at the ‘Bali international prison’.

He said once Corby signs her release she will be handed over to immigration officers who will escort her out of the country.

“I hope that we as Indonesians can always uphold human rights for anyone coming to Indonesia,” he said.

Normally the Parole Office has just two staff working on a Saturday but for Corby, chiefs called in 30 personnel from their usual day off.

Cindy Wockner on Schapelle Corby and her imminent return to Australia

CORBY’S HEAVY POLICE ESCORT

Around midday today, about 20 police were given a final briefing of procedures for the Corby exit in the parole office courtyard before dramatically, with sirens, horns and whistles blaring, they performed a full dress rehearsal with an armoured convoy of vans and trucks carrying another 30 police troops.

Police officers simulate the transport of Schapelle Corby from the Bali Parole office in Denpasar to the airport by Indonesian Immigration for deportation to Australia. Picture: Nathan Edwards

Police officers simulate the transport of Schapelle Corby from the Bali Parole office in Denpasar to the airport by Indonesian Immigration for deportation to Australia. Picture: Nathan Edwards Source: Supplied

Two armoured tactical cars were in the convoy with one expected to carry Corby. People outside the parole gates were asking what’s happening, with local media and police yelling back “Corby, Corby” to which locals knowingly nodded.

“The marijuana queen finally leave,” said one local cafe worker passing by as police blowing whistles forced people to move on.

Present also was Titiek Sudaryatmi, the head of the parole office, and her staff many of whom have been involved specifically in the Corby case for many years.

Police officers arrive at the Bali Parole office in Denpasar to prepare for Schapelle Corby’s departure. Picture: Nathan Edwards

Police officers arrive at the Bali Parole office in Denpasar to prepare for Schapelle Corby’s departure. Picture: Nathan Edwards Source: Supplied

Denpasar police chief Hadi Purnomo told News Corporation today it was planned to use the same vehicle which has been used previously to transport police murder suspects, Byron Bay woman Sara Connor and her British boyfriend David Taylor.

Known as a tactical vehicle, Mr Purnomo said it was planned to use that vehicle “for security reasons”.

“The car is usually used to take prisoners,” he said, adding that the Corby family had not sought this.

The heavily armoured police tactical vehicle that could be Schapelle Corby’s ride to freedom. Picture: Lukman S. Bintoro

The heavily armoured police tactical vehicle that could be Schapelle Corby’s ride to freedom. Picture: Lukman S. Bintoro Source: News Corp Australia

“No, not the family, we will use it for security reasons,” Mr Purnomo said.

The villa where Schapelle Corby has been living in Bali, Indonesia. Picture: Getty

The villa where Schapelle Corby has been living in Bali, Indonesia. Picture: Getty Source: Getty Images

Mr Widiada said four police cars would escort Corby from her home to the parole board and then to the airport.

More than 100 police will be deployed in the operation to ensure Corby’s freedom ride goes smoothly and there are no injuries or incidents.

Police officers arrive at the Bali Parole office in Denpasar to prepare for Schapelle Corby to report one last time. Picture: Nathan Edwards.

Police officers arrive at the Bali Parole office in Denpasar to prepare for Schapelle Corby to report one last time. Picture: Nathan Edwards. Source: Supplied

The office at the Bali Parole office in Denpasar where Schapelle Corby will sign the paperwork allowing her to be deported to Australia. Picture: Nathan Edwards

The office at the Bali Parole office in Denpasar where Schapelle Corby will sign the paperwork allowing her to be deported to Australia. Picture: Nathan EdwardsSource: Supplied

Police also conducted a dry run at the parole offices of what the Corby arrival could look like to ensure she could make a quick entry and exit of the building.

At least 50 police are to be stationed at this location with others controlling the busy thoroughfare out front, at times chocked with Saturday shoppers, media vans and local onlookers, many eager to see the large police presence and marvelling at a low flying drone recording the scene.

Police spent some time walking about the building and streets looking at security measures.

Originally published as Schapelle Corby is a free woman


Corby leaves Bali villa to begin return

 
Lauren FarrowAustralian Associated Press

Schapelle Corby has left her Kuta home to attend the corrections office where she will report for the final time before she is deported to Australia.

These are the final steps in the journey that started 12 and a half years ago when she was caught at Denpasar airport with 4.2kg of marijuana in her boogie board bag in October 2004.

She was initially sentenced to 20 years in jail and spent more than a decade in Kerobokan prison.

Corby, 39, is now considered a “free woman” after her parole period ended just after midnight.

Head of Bali’s Law and Human Rights Office, Ida Bagus Ketut Adnyana, says Corby will be escorted to corrections in Denpasar to report for the last time and sign her release letter.

At around 6.30pm, she will go to the airport where she is due to board a 10.10pm Virgin flight to Brisbane.

Bali officials have said her sister Mercedes is “expecting a lot from security officials”, citing security concerns around the large media contingent on the Indonesian island and anyone else who “objects to her release”.

Officials say they want to keep her time at the airport brief, citing “security concerns”.

They are expecting around a quarter of the passengers on the flight to be from the media.

Mercedes Corby and her bodyguard, who has protected the likes of the Dalai Lama and Roger Federer, are expected to join her on the journey, as are correction officials.

She is expected to land in Brisbane – to another large media contingent – at 0545 on Sunday.

Her departure marks the end of the case that has put a strain on the often tumultuous relationship between Indonesia and Australia.

“Not only was it a major political issue between our two countries, it defined the bilateral relationship for a number of years,” President of the Australian-based Indonesia Institute Ross Taylor told AAP.

It also revealed Australia’s “distorted perception” of Indonesia as a very “narrow one” – with “Schapelle Corby, Bintang Beer, Bali, terrorism and boat people” becoming synonymous with our neighbour, he added.

39 dead in New Year ‘terror attack’ on Istanbul nightclub Reina


January 1 2017 – 9:06PM

Istanbul, Turkey nightclub attack: more than a dozen foreigners among the dead, say officials

Istanbul:  Police in Istanbul launched a manhunt on Sunday for a gunman who killed at least 39 people, many of them foreigners, at a nightclub packed with New Year’s revellers, in an attack officials described as a terrorist act.

The gunman shot his way into the Reina nightclub at around 1.15am local time, just over an hour into the new year, killing a police officer and a civilian as he entered before opening fire at random inside

Some witnesses spoke of multiple attackers, but officials have not confirmed this.

 

“A manhunt for the terrorist is underway. Police have launched operations. We hope the attacker will be captured soon,” he told reporters.

Turkey has imposed a media blackout after the attack, although the restriction doesn’t extend to officials, BBC reported.

Australian embassy officials are working with Turkish authorities to determine if any Australians are victims of the nightclub attack.

 

 

The nightclub, one of Istanbul’s most iconic that is popular with locals and foreigners alike, overlooks the Bosphorus Strait separating Europe and Asia in the city’s cosmopolitan Ortakoy district.

Istanbul Governor Vasip Sahin said the attacker had used a “long-range weapon” to “brutally and savagely” fire on people, apparently referring to some sort of assault rifle.

“One person first kills the police officer outside, and then a civilian,” the governor said. “Inside he rained bullets brutally, mercilessly over innocent people who were there just to celebrate the new year and have fun.”

 

People talk to medics in an ambulance near the scene of an attack in Istanbul. Photo: APThe Hurriyet newspaper cited witnesses as saying there were multiple attackers and that they shouted in Arabic.

 

Her husband Lutfu Uyanik was wounded in the attack.

 

 

 

Her husband was not in serious condition despite his wounds.

There was no immediate claim of responsibility for the shooting. The mass killing at the nightclub was at least the fourth major attack in Turkey in less than a month, raising questions about the ability of the government, a NATO member and critical regional ally of the United States, to counter an array of threats stemming from the war across Turkey’s border in Syria, as well as an escalating conflict with Kurdish militants inside Turkey.

 

An image, reportedly of one of the gunmen involved in the attack at the Istanbul nightclub.Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said his country would fight to the end against all forms of attack by terror groups and their backers.

“As a nation, we will fight to the end against not just the armed attacks of terror groups and the forces behind them, but also against their economic, political and social attacks,” Erdogan said in a written statement.

“They are trying to create chaos, demoralise our people, and destabilise our country with abominable attacks which target civilians … We will retain our cool-headedness as a nation, standing more closely together, and we will never give ground to such dirty games,” he said.

On the European side of the country’s capital, about 12km from Istanbul, the suburb of Ortakoy is an international travel destination known for its food stalls and vibrant night life. The area is a mix of stone, brick and wooden buildings along pedestrian lanes.

Mehmet Kocarslan, the club’s owner, told the Hurriyet.com.tr news site that there had been increased security at the club for the past 10 days after US intelligence officials shared information about the planned attack. He said the attackers used Kalashnikov rifles.

Television footage showed dozens of ambulances rushing to the scene, and people fleeing, some walking with difficulty arm in arm.

Footage from the scene showed at least six ambulances with flashing lights and civilians being escorted out. NTV said police had cordoned off the area and an operation to capture the assailant was ongoing.

An AP photographer says police cordoned off the area about three kilometres away from the nightclub and reported multiple ambulances passing by.

President Barack Obama expressed condolences on Saturday over the attack and directed his team to offer US help to Turkish authorities, the White House said.

“This afternoon the President was briefed by his national security team on the attack in Istanbul,” White House spokesman Eric Schultz said in a statement.

“The President expressed condolences for the innocent lives lost, directed his team to offer appropriate assistance to the Turkish authorities, as necessary, and keep him updated as warranted.”

Britain’s Foreign Secretary, Boris Johnson, responded on Twitter, saying his thoughts were with Turkey after this “cowardly act of terrorism”.

“We stand shoulder to shoulder with our Turkish friends,” he added.

Security measures had been heightened in major Turkish cities, with police barring traffic leading up to key squares in Istanbul and the capital Ankara. In Istanbul, 17,000 police officers were put on duty, some camouflaged as Santa Claus and others as street vendors, state news agency Anadolu reported.

Ankara and Istanbul have been targeted by several attacks in 2016 carried out by the Islamic State group or Kurdish rebels, killing more than 180 people.

Turkey is still recovering from a failed coup attempt that began July 15 in which at least 265 people were killed.

Although the coup effort sputtered in a matter of hours, Mr Erdogan responded with a sweeping, months-long crackdown targeting alleged dissidents across Turkish society.

In addition to arresting thousands of military personnel suspected of involvement in the coup, hundreds of thousands of civil servants, educational staff and journalists were purged.

The coup and the assassination of the Russian Ambassador Andrey G. Karlov in Ankara on December 19 raised concerns that the country’s security establishment had grown ineffective.

The turmoil also raised doubts about how well Turkey would be able to participate in international counter-terrorism efforts, especially with regard to the Islamic State.

DPA/Reuters/AP/New York Times/Washington Post


abc.net.au

39 dead in New Year ‘terror attack’ on Istanbul nightclub

 Sun 1 Jan 2017, 9:15pm

A gunman shot his way into an Istanbul nightclub packed with New Year’s revellers early on Sunday, killing at least 39 people and wounding almost 70 others in what the provincial Governor described as a terrorist attack.

Key points:

  • Istanbul city governor condemned the “terrorist attack” on the popular Reina nightclub
  • Around 500-600 people were thought to be in the club when the attack happened
  • The attacker was believed to have entered the premises dressed as Santa Claus, local media reported

The assailant shot a police officer and a civilian as he entered the Reina nightclub before opening fire at random inside.

“A terrorist with a long-range weapon… brutally and savagely carried out this incident by firing bullets on innocent people who were there solely to celebrate the New Year and have fun,” Governor Vasip Sahin told reporters at the scene.

Turkish Interior Minister Suleyman Soylu said the attacker was still at large and 69 people were being treated in hospitals following the shooting.

Mr Soylu said of the victims identified so far, 16 were foreign nationals. He did not provide any information on their countries.

In a statement, President Tayyip Erdogan said that Turkey would fight to the end against all forms of attack by terror groups and their backers.

“As a nation, we will fight to the end against not just the armed attacks of terror groups and the forces behind them, but also against their economic, political and social attacks,” he said.

“They are trying to create chaos, demoralise our people, and destabilise our country with abominable attacks which target civilians … we will retain our cool-headedness as a nation, standing more closely together, and we will never give ground to such dirty games,” he said.

‘I had to lift several bodies from on top of me’

Around 500-600 people were thought to have been in the club when the attack happened at around 1:15am local time, broadcaster CNN Turk said.

The club lies on the shore of the Bosphorus Strait in the Ortakoy district, and some jumped into the water to save themselves and were being rescued by police.

Police with riot gear and machine guns backed up by armoured vehicles blocked the area close to the Reina nightclub.

Witness Sinem Uyanik, whose husband Lutfu Uyanik was wounded in the attack, told AP she saw several bodies inside the nightclub.

“Before I could understand what was happening, my husband fell on top me,” she said outside Istanbul’s Sisli Hospital.

“I had to lift several bodies from on top of me before I could get out.”

The attacker was believed to have entered the nightclub dressed as Santa Claus, private NTV television reported earlier.

Broadcaster CNN Turk initially said the attacker was thought still to be inside the building and that police special forces were preparing to raid it. NTV said the attacker’s whereabouts were unclear.

Dozens of ambulances and police vehicles were dispatched to the club in Ortakoy, a cosmopolitan neighbourhood nestled under one of three bridges crossing the Bosphorus, and home to clubs, restaurants and art galleries.

DFAT determining if any Australians involved

The Department of Foreign Affairs said the Australian embassy in Ankara was liaising with local authorities to determine if any Australians were caught up in the attack.

Reina is one of Istanbul’s best-known nightclubs, popular with locals and tourists alike.

Security measures had been heightened in major Turkish cities, with police barring traffic leading up to key squares in Istanbul and the capital Ankara. In Istanbul, 17,000 police officers were put on duty, some camouflaged as Santa Claus and others as street vendors, Anadolu reported.

Ankara and Istanbul have been targeted by several attacks in 2016 carried out by the Islamic State (IS) group or Kurdish rebels, killing more than 180 people.

Turkey, part of the US-led coalition against IS, faces multiple security threats including spill-over from the war in neighbouring Syria.

It has seen repeated attacks and bombings blamed on IS as well as Kurdish militants in recent months.

US President Barack Obama “expressed condolences for the innocent lives lost”, and said assistance would be offered to Turkish authorities.

Turkish Justice Minister Bekir Bozdag vowed that his country would press ahead with its fight against violent groups.

“Turkey will continue its determined and effective combat to root out terror,” Mr Bozdag said on Twitter.

ABC/wires

Topics: terrorism, unrest-conflict-and-war, turkey

First posted about 11 hours agoSun 1 Jan 2017, 10:25am

Drug ring raids net historic $360m cocaine haul


abc.net.au

Drug ring raids net historic $360m cocaine haul

By Siobhan Fogarty

Updated 18 minutes ago

Thu 29 Dec 2016, 12:17pm

A former NRL player and a Bondi businessman have been linked to a drug ring after New South Wales Police recorded the biggest cocaine haul in Australia’s history.

Key points:

  • 1.1 tonnes of cocaine worth $360 million seized by AFP and NSW police
  • Two seizures of cocaine make the biggest haul of the drug in Australian history
  • 15 men arrested including a former NRL player and a Bondi businessman

The joint strike force between Australian Federal Police and the New South Wales Police drug squad arrested 15 men and seized about $360 million worth of cocaine.

Former Roosters player John Tobin is one of the accused smugglers, along with Bondi businessman Darren Mohr.

The criminal syndicate was allegedly using a trawler based at the Sydney Fish Market to meet a “mother ship” from South America to bring drugs into the country.

About 500 kilograms of the drug was seized on Christmas Day at Brooklyn on the central coast of New South Wales.

Police allege 600 kilograms was seized in Tahiti and 32 kilograms of heroin was found in Fiji with both loads destined for the market in Australia.

Acting Assistant Commissioner, Chris Sheehan, said the police operation had been running for almost three years and escalated with the arrests over the Christmas period.

“The criminal syndicate we have dismantled over the last few days was a robust, resilient and determined syndicate,” he said.

“This is the largest cocaine seizure we have had in Australia.

“It posed an ongoing and continued threat to the Australian community and without the work of our police, would still be in action today.”

Tip-off from community led to bust

Assistant Police Commissioner, Mark Jenkins said a member of the community gave them a tip-off two and a half years ago that led to the cocaine haul.

“As a result, over one tonne of drugs has been prevented from reaching the streets of New South Wales and harming the community,” he said.

“That small piece of information has resulted in 15 arrests and a large seizure of drugs.”

Media player: “Space” to play, “M” to mute, “left” and “right” to seek.

Video: Police seized 500kg worth of cocaine in NSW (ABC News)

Officers allege the group of men, aged from 29 to 63, are involved in the Australian criminal syndicate responsible for the attempted imports.

They have been charged with serious drug importation offences and eleven of the 15 men have appeared before Parramatta Local Court and were refused bail.

A 49-year-old man and a 63-year-old man are due to appear before Central Local Court today.

Two other men, a 33-year-old and 39-year-old are also expected to front Nowra Local Court today after they were arrested at Ulladulla yesterday.

Police said they were confident all alleged members of the criminal syndicate were in custody.

Media player: “Space” to play, “M” to mute, “left” and “right” to seek.

Video: Arrests made after $360m worth of cocaine seized (ABC News)

Topics: crime, law-crime-and-justice, drug-offences, nsw

First posted about 4 hours agoThu 29 Dec 2016, 7:48am


smh.com.au

Police smash cocaine ring at Sydney Fish Market in Christmas Day raid

By Rachel Olding, Latika Bourke, Rachel Browne

A former rugby league first grade player, a Bondi entrepreneur and a several fishermen are among 15 men arrested on Christmas Day in a multimillion-dollar cocaine ring bust.

Police will allege the men were imported more than a tonne of cocaine via the iconic Sydney Fish Market and other NSW ports.

Australian Federal Police Acting Assistant Commissioner Chris Sheehan described the alleged syndicate as “robust, resilient and determined”.

He told a packed Sydney press conference that the 15 arrested men were “determined to exploit some of the most vulnerable members of the community.”

The seizure of 500kg of cocaine in Sydney, 600kg of the drug in Tahiti and 32kg of heroin in Fiji make it the largest drug bust of its kind in Australia.

NSW Police State Crime Commander Mark Jenkins said all the drugs originated in South America before being transferred across the South Pacific by ship.

Several of the men were arrested on Christmas Day as they docked a shipping vessel named Dalrymple at the Sydney Fish Markets.

It’s alleged the boat was used to ferry drugs between NSW ports and a larger ship stationed out at sea that held drugs smuggled from Chile.

Operation Okesi, comprising officers from NSW Police, Australian Federal Police and Australian Border Force, started over two-and-a-half-years after police received a “thread” of information.

Since then, five alleged importations by the sophisticated syndicate have been thwarted.

It includes the seizure of 32 kilograms of heroin by authorities in Fiji in December 2014 and the seizure of 606 kilograms of cocaine by authorities in Tahiti in March.

Officers then observed the Dalrymple depart the Sydney Fish Markets on December 3 and travel to the Central Coast. The vessel was monitored by Maritime Border Command and the NSW Police’s Marine Area Command.

On Christmas night, officers watched the crew launch a small one-man dinghy which allegedly travelled to Parlsey Bay at Brooklyn on the NSW Central Coast and met with two other men.

All three were arrested and about 500 kilograms of cocaine was seized from the dinghy.

Several other men were arrested on board the Dalrymple vessel as it docked at Sydney Fish Market on Christmas night.

A police source told Fairfax Media the syndicate thought they could take advantage of the festive season by striking on Christmas Day.

Authorities valued the total amount of cocaine seized at $360 million.

Among the men arrested is former Eastern Suburbs Roosters player John Roland Boyd Tobin, who played 125 matches as lock forward in the 1980s.

Bondi entrepreneur Darren John Mohr was also arrested. He lists his occupation as the owner Martini Motors and is also the former owner of the Bondi Rescue HQ cafe.

His Instagram profile shows a love of Harley Davidson motorbikes, Rolls Royce cars and being shirtless.

Police also arrested Reuben John Dawe, who lists his occupation as a maritime worker and commercial fisherman Joseph Pirrello, 63.

Other man arrested in the sting include Simon Peter Spero, 56, Graham Toa Toa, 42, Stuart Ayrton, 54, Jonathan Cooper, 29, Richard Lipton, 37, Frank D’Agostino, 54, and Benjamin Sara, 31.

They were all refused bail in Parramatta Bail Court on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday.

Two other men, extradited from Tasmania and Queensland, will appear in Parramatta Bail Court on Thursday as well as two men arrested in the Nowra area.

Footage released by police show multiple men being arrested in the dark from on-board the Dalrymple fishing vessel.

One of the men shown with his hands tied behind his back is wearing only a pair of boxer shorts covered in cartoon pictures of crocodiles.

“This operation has been running for more than two-and-a-half years and culminated over the Christmas period,” a police statement reads.

The men were aged between 29 and 63 years old.  Police are due to address the media at 11am on Thursday.

Bali police murder: British man David Taylor admits to hitting officer with beer bottle


Bali police murder: British man David Taylor admits to hitting officer with beer bottle, lawyer says

23/08/16

A British man accused of the murder of a police officer in Bali has confessed to hitting the man with a beer bottle and an old mobile phone, his lawyer says.

Key points:

  • Taylor’s lawyer said his client had wrestled with the police officer
  • Lawyer also said the couple burned their clothes
  • Connor’s lawyer said she was not involved in the murder

After almost 12 hours of interrogation, David James Taylor dramatically changed his story and told police he had struggled with the officer and admitted to punching him, although his lawyers said he could not remember how many times.

Taylor and his Australian girlfriend Sara Connor, a 45-year-old mother of two from Byron Bay, have been detained for allegedly murdering local policeman Wayan Sudarsa.

He was found with 42 wounds to his body, including his head and neck, on Kuta Beach.

Taylor’s lawyers said he had asked the policeman where Connor’s missing bag was, and after he had tried to check the man’s pocket, they had begun to “wrestle”.

“When he is struggling with this man apparently he found this bottle and then he is trying to hit this man with this bottle,” Taylor’s lawyer Erick Sihombing said.

“He found an old cell phone, he hit the guy’s head on the back maybe twice. There is a bottle and an old phone.

“After the fight was done, he went out on the street, he found his girlfriend on the street and then he’s just said to his girlfriend the bag has already gone so let’s go back to the hotel.”

Taylor also confessed that he and Connor burned their clothes.

“On Friday the 19th of August, they found on their clothes and trousers a stain of blood and hair, that’s why they tried to get rid of them by burning their clothes,” Mr Sihombing said.

The Australian woman has told police when she had tried to separate the men while they were fighting, the police officer bit her on her thigh and hand.

She said she had no idea the police officer was dead and her boyfriend had told her he was just unconscious.

“According to the result of the investigation today, Sara said that she was not involved in this murder, she was not involved at all with this murder,” her lawyer Erwin Siregar said.

“Sara tried to separate David and the victim, but she could not do it and then because of that the victim bit the right hand of Sara and also the leg on the left side.”

 

Officer also hit with binoculars, lawyer says

Earlier, Taylor’s lawyer had said he had also bashed the man in the head with a pair of binoculars that were hanging around his neck.

“During the wrestle, Sara tried to keep them apart during which David saw they’re were binoculars on the victim’s neck. Then he smashed the binoculars to the victim’s head,” Mr Sihombing said.

“He hit the cop’s head twice using the binoculars.”

Connor and Taylor both faced questioning late into the evening on Monday.

It is understood Connor and Taylor first met in Byron Bay, where Connor runs a pasta-making business and Taylor hosted a weekly radio show.

Police have up to 100 days to build their case against the two, who face a maximum of 15 years in jail.

From other news sites:

Tennis match-fixing: 40 games targeted by bookmakers during three-month period in 2015


More than 40 professional tennis matches were flagged for potential match-fixing by international bookmakers in just a three-month period last year — an average of more than three times a week.

Key points:

  • At least 20 players involved reported to world tennis authorities
  • Blacklist contains more than 350 names
  • Two players are low-ranked Australians
  • Third review for the sport in 11 years

The fixtures took place at tournaments in countries including Colombia, Morocco, Russia and Germany between September and November 2015, eight years after tennis first vowed to fight the scourge of corruption.

At least 20 of the players involved in those matches have been reported to world tennis authorities on previous occasions — a dozen of them were first flagged by integrity investigators as far back as 2008.

Explained: Andy Cunningham from sports integrity firm Sportradar demonstrates how monitoring betting odds can identify suspicions of a match fix

Several of the players also appear on a separate blacklist obtained as part of a Four Corners investigation into match-fixing and the underworld figures who control bookmaking across Asia.

The blacklist is maintained by a European bookmaker of tennis professionals not trusted to always play to win.

The list contains more than 350 names, including at least 10 who played at this year’s Australian Open.

Two of the players on the list are low-ranked Australians, but the majority hail from developing economies in South America, Asia and Eastern Europe, where integrity measures in the sport are at their weakest. Four Corners has provided the list to tennis authorities.

The revelations come five days after the heads of each major tennis governing body — the Association of Tennis Professionals, the International Tennis Federation, the Grand Slam Board and the Women’s Tennis Association — announced a review of the sports integrity regime by a London barrister, Adam Lewis QC.

The investigation was prompted by news reports out of London that linked top-ranked players to corruption in the sport, prompting a global furore and overshadowing the first grand slam on the tennis calendar, the Australian Open.

The review will be the third for the sport in 11 years.

Four Corners has interviewed those who conducted the previous two reviews, all of whom say the sports’ governing bodies are facing a growing problem with matches fixed every single week somewhere across the world.

Do you know more about this story? Email besser.linton@abc.net.au

Tennis buried report warning of ‘deliberate underperformance’

The first major warning was given to tennis by the man who would go on to become Australia’s anti-doping chief, Richard Ings.

As an ATP executive, he produced a scathing report in November 2005 that was meant to have been made public.

The Ings report warned tennis it was “an alarming wake-up call for the sport of men’s professional tennis and its governing bodies”.

“Deliberate underperformance by players and ensuing gambling and alleged corruption that results from such deliberate underperformance, appear to pervade all levels of the men’s professional game today,” the report stated.

Mr Ings recommended the establishment of a uniform anti-corruption code and an integrity unit to more fully investigate 37 matches that were highly suspicious.

But tennis buried the Ings report and did not act on either recommendation until a major scandal years two later.

The controversy centred on a match in Poland in 2007 involving then world’s fourth-best player, Nikolay Davydenko, after Britain’s betting exchange, Betfair, voided all bets on the match.

Although there was ultimately insufficient evidence to make a finding against the Russian, the team investigating that match also discovered damaging evidence about a far wider corruption problem.

This time the investigators identified another 44 matches that required urgent investigation and potential sanction against several key players.

Instead, tennis authorities set up a minimal integrity regime and decided not to go after the players involved, citing a new player code that would not be applied retrospectively.

‘There is still a huge question mark over integrity’

Mark Phillips, a betting analyst from Global Sports Integrity, was one of the investigators involved in the 2007/8 probe.

Bookmakers’ blacklist


One of the players embroiled in a feared match-fixing controversy at the Australian Open, David Marrero, has appeared on a secret blacklist of professional tennis players who have played in matches bookmakers deemed to be suspicious.

He told Four Corners he believed that had tennis followed up with their investigation it would have been able to root out the core people corrupting other players.

“We actually did a presentation, showed various parts of the investigation that we had done and then physically handed over data files and actual ring binders of evidence that we had collected,” he said.

“We were pretty experienced at investigating these types of matters and we believed the evidence to be very strong.”

One of the heads of the review, Ben Gunn, said tennis at the time was at a “cross roads”.

“I think it’s disappointing eight years later, having had two reviews eight years later, that it appears there is still a huge question mark over the integrity of some tennis games,” he said.

Bad Sport, a Four Corners investigation, can be seen at 8:30pm on ABC TV.

Tennis match-fixing scandal: How it unfolded

Updated Wed at 2:44pm

Tennis has ordered an investigation into its anti-corruption unit after it was left reeling by reports of match-fixing.

Here is how the story rapidly unfolded from when it first broke on January 18 to the announcement of the independent review panel on January 27.

Investigation reportedly uncovers evidence of match-fixing by core group of 16 players

January 18, 2016

BuzzFeed News and the BBC reveal details of a probe which found 16 players had lost games when suspicious bets were placed against them.

A US Open champion and doubles winners at Wimbledon were among the core group, while one top-50 ranked player competing in the Australian Open is suspected of repeatedly fixing his first set;

Players were reportedly targeted in hotel rooms and offered $73,100 or more per fix.

The report looked at analysis of betting on 26,000 tennis matches and contained evidence of suspected match-fixing by gambling syndicates based in Russia and Italy uncovered as a result of an investigation in 2008, but over which no action had been taken.

ATP ‘absolutely rejects’ claims evidence of match-fixing has been suppressed

January 18, 2016

The president of the Association of Tennis Professionals (ATP) says the governing body “absolutely rejects” that evidence of match-fixing in the sport has been suppressed or overlooked.

“The Tennis Integrity Unit (TIU) and the tennis authorities absolutely reject any suggestion that evidence of match fixing has been suppressed for any reason or isn’t being thoroughly investigated,” said Chris Kermode at a press conference at Melbourne Park.

Tennis’s big names react to the allegations

January 20, 2016

With the allegations emerging as 2016’s first major got underway, high-profile players were immediately put on the spot by the media. Aussie young gun Thanasi Kokkinakis was one of the first to speak, admitting he had been approached by “randoms” on social media to fix matches.

Men’s world number one Novak Djokovic fronted the press, dismissing a report in an international newspaper that he “wanted to lose” a match in 2007 and saying he felt terrible when he has been asked to fix a match in 2006, while retiring Australian great Lleyton Hewitt also went on the offensive after a blog linked him to the list of 16 names.

Novak Djokovic: “Speculation”

What it is to say?

Anybody can create a story about any match.

That’s my point. There hasn’t been too many matches where top players lost in last decade or so in early rounds. You can pick any match that you like that the top player lost and just create a story out of it.

I think it’s not supported by any kind of proof, any evidence, any facts. It’s just speculation. So I don’t think there is a story about it.

This is now the main story in tennis, in [the] sports world, there’s going to be a lot of allegations.

Andy Murray: “More transparent”

If there is corruption in any sport, you know, you want to hear about it.

As a player you just want to be made aware of everything that’s going on. I think we deserve to know everything that’s sort of out there.

Some of it will be true, some of it might not be true. But I’m always very curious with that stuff across really all sports, as well. I think sports could in general be much, much more transparent.

Roger Federer: “Names”

I would love to hear names.

Then at least it’s concrete stuff and you can actually debate about it. Was it the player? Was it the support team? Who was it? Was it before? Was it a doubles player, a singles player? Which slam?

It’s super serious and it’s super important to maintain the integrity of our sport.

So how high up does it go? The higher it goes, the more surprised I would be.

Lleyton Hewitt: “Absurd”

I think it’s a joke to deal with it. Obviously, there’s no possible way. I know my name’s now been thrown into it.

I don’t think anyone here would think that I’ve done anything (like) corruption or match-fixing. It’s just absurd.

For anyone that tries to go any further with it, then good luck. Take me on with it.

Yeah, it’s disappointing. I think throwing my name out there with it makes the whole thing an absolute farce.

Online bookmakers suspend betting on a mixed doubles match at the Australian Open

January 24, 2016

Betting agency Pinnacle Sports received large bets from a small number of people on Sunday’s doubles match between Czech Republic’s Andrea Hlavackova and Poland’s Lukasz Kubot and Spain’s Lara Arruabarrena and David Marrero.

The agency said it was unusual for such large bets to be placed on minor matches. It was later revealed at least 19 other bookmakers including Ladbrokes also cancelled their betting markets on the match, according to historical betting data available online.

Hlavackova and Kubot won the match 6-0, 6-3 in 49 minutes, with the New York times reporting on Monday that the unusual betting patterns on the match had led Pinnacle Sports to suspend markets 13 hours before the scheduled start.

Spanish doubles player Marrero appears on blacklist of players who bookmakers deem suspicious

January 25, 2016

A secret bookmakers’ blacklist of tennis players is handed over to authorities, with ABC’s Four Corners revealing Marrero’s name is featured in the document.

The list is maintained by one of Europe’s biggest bookmakers.

The development comes after the president of the International Tennis Federation, David Haggerty, told Four Corners: “Players at all levels are vulnerable to corruption.”

Tennis announces independent review into the effectiveness of tennis’s anti-corruption program

January 27, 2016

Adam Lewis QC is appointed to lead an independent review panel to report on the appropriateness and effectiveness of the Tennis Anit-Corruption Program, aimed at safeguarding the integrity of the game.

The chairmen and chief executives of tennis’s governing bodies, the ATP, WTA, ITF and Grand Slam Board, commit to fund and implement all actions recommended by the panel.

 

Mexican “Safari” ends in murder for Aussies Dean Lucas and Adam Coleman


Missing Surfers

THE coastal Mexican region where the bodies of two men were found in a burnt-out van, likely to be identified as a pair of missing Australian surfers, has earned a reputation as the country’s murder capital.

Dean Lucas and Adam Coleman were travelling the picturesque coastline of northern Mexico in search of the kind of off-track surf beaches you wouldn’t find in a Lonely Planet guide.

Mr Lucas’s partner Josie Cox, who he had planned to propose to, said the men were a couple of “very keen and confident surfers” and “may have gone in search of waves in remote villages close by”.

It was on those remote roads they were driving overnight that it appears the pair ran into significant trouble.

The men were believed to be camping en route from Topolobampo to Guadalajara but, unusually, had not made contact with their girlfriends or family members for more than a week.

As Australian authorities communicated news of a “tragic event” to the families of Mr Lucas and Mr Coleman, reports emerged two bodies had been found in a torched vehicle appearing to have once matched the description of the blue and white camper they were driving.

Mexican authorities inspect a burnt-out van suspected to belong to a couple of Australian tourists missing for more than a week, in Sinaloa, Mexico. Picture: AP PhotoSource:AP

The WA friends were only about 25km from bustling modern cities and tourist attractions. Although most parts of Mexico are safe to visit when precautions are taken, away from the tourist cities and under cover of darkness are when many areas reveal how they’ve been touched by the country’s roaring underground drug trade and organised crime.

La Trobe University Institute of Latin American Studies senior fellow Dr Barry Carr says the two travelling surfers may be an extreme example of what can go wrong in the country.

“Parts of Mexico have a partly deserved reputation for being a dangerous place,” he tells news.com.au.

“If I was giving advice to friends of mine about driving, I would tell them two things: don’t drive at night and don’t, under any circumstances, get off the main highways. You can be in the wrong place at the wrong time, classically, and it looks like that unfortunately may be the case for these young men.”

Dr Carr says that the picture of the burnt-out vehicle, while not a signature of any particular criminal group, was an extreme example of fairly common gang behaviour in many parts of rural Mexico.

“There is the so-called war on drugs in Mexico that has been raging since 2006. Around 102,000 have been killed and 32,000 have been disappeared. Disappeared people is a very common phenomenon — disappeared foreigners is less so but very unfortunately it does happen,” he said.

“These guys were outsiders, there is nothing to suggest that they were involved in anything illegal. They could have been lost, they could have been carrying valuables, they simply could have been picked up, robbed by some local thugs or could have fallen victim to some sort of stand-over tactic.”

Adam Coleman (pictured) had been on his way to meet up with his girlfriend in Guadalajara. Picture: FacebookSource:AAP

Rural kidnapping, robberies and theft not necessarily connected with the drug trade is a risk travellers take when going off-road in Mexico.

The state of Sinaloa, where Mr Coleman and Mr Lucas had travelled, has long been a notorious area for crime and is on the radars of international government authorities such as Australia’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade with warnings often in place.

Home to one of Mexico’s most significant international drug trafficking and organised crime syndicate, the Sinaloa Cartel, the Mexican state has both benefited and lost out from the distribution of cocaine and other drugs the organisation specialises in.

“There’s no secret there’s white powder behind a lot of the wealth in that state,” Dr Carr says.

One of the leaders of the Sinaloa Cartel, Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman, rose to international infamy pulling off an incredible escape from a Mexican prison in July.

The municipality of Navolato, about 25km west of the city of Culiacan, has been the site of countless murders and mafia activity in recent years.

Reports from local media detail burnt-out cars discarded on the streets of the notorious town, and brutal deaths likely associated with the drug trade, Dr Carr says.

Adam Coleman. Picture: FacebookSource :AAP

Dean Lucas. Picture: FacebookSource :Supplied

Although nothing has been confirmed of the identity of the bodies found in the van in Navolato, nor the whereabouts of the two missing men, those close to the men are fearing the worst.

Mr Coleman’s Mexican girlfriend, Andrea Gomez, told the Associated Press she and Mr Lucas’s partner, Josie Cox, will travel to the Sinaloan capital of Culiacan to see if the two bodies are the men.

“Everything points to it being them because the van matches; it had a bicycle,” Ms Gomez said.

She said that Ms Cox was bringing Mr Lucas’s dental records for matching and she had “pieces of dreadlocks” that Mr Coleman had given her.

The Department of Foreign Affairs is providing consular assistance to the families and issued a statement on their behalf on Sunday, saying they were aware the van had been found and a “tragic event” had occurred.

“The families hold deep fears for the safety of their sons, but stress that they are still waiting for details to be confirmed,” a statement from the department said.

An online fundraising campaign to support the families of the two men has received more than $22,000 in a matter of hours.

Fault Lines travels to the troubled Mexican state of Michoacan to find out what happens when vigilante groups take on powerful drug cartels.


Missing surfers: Families of Australians Adam Coleman, Dean Lucas head to Mexico amid reports unidentified bodies found in van

Updated about 5 hours ago

The families of two West Australian surfers missing in Mexico hold grave fears for their safety, amid reports two bodies were found in a burnt-out van similar to the one the men were travelling in.

Dean Lucas and Adam Coleman were travelling in a van towards Guadalajara, but failed to arrive at their destination by November 21 as planned.

A media outlet in Mexico said two bodies had been found in a burnt-out Chevrolet van matching the description of the one the men were travelling, but local police have not confirmed or denied if they are the Australians.

Mexican authorities will run DNA tests on the two charred bodies and the girlfriends of the men are helping with DNA testing, an official told Reuters.

The official from Sinaloa’s local prosecutor’s office said the bodies were too charred to identify.

A photo of the burnt van shows a bicycle on the back and a spare tyre, similar to the one the men took on their road trip. Local reporters have told the ABC food tins and cooking utensils were also found in the van.

“Nothing is confirmed, it’s just a similar van,” Dean Lucas’s girlfriend Josie Cox told the ABC.

“[It’s] most likely theirs but I’m keeping positive it’s not.”

The torched van was found in the state of Sinaloa — one of the most dangerous and violent places in Mexico, home to powerful gangs and drug cartels.

The US State Department has advised people not to travel there outside of one major city, and says travelling on anything other than major toll roads is especially dangerous.

The families of the two men said they were aware the van had been found and that a “tragic event” had occurred, but still did not know exactly what had happened.

“The families and partners are aware the van in which they were travelling has been located by Mexican authorities and that a tragic event has occurred,” the families said in a statement released by DFAT on Sunday.

“The families hold deep fears for the safety of their sons but stress that they are still waiting for details to be confirmed.”

Family and friends have paid tribute to the men on social media.

A spokesperson for the Department of Foreign Affairs said it “is providing consular assistance to families in Australia who are seeking to establish the welfare of other family members in Mexico.”

“Due to privacy reasons we will not be making further comment.”

From other news sites:

  • Yahoo!7 News: Burnt van fears for missing WA surfers in Mexico

  • Everything points to it being them’: Girlfriend of one of two Australian surfers missing in Mexico gives police a DREADLOCK of his hair to help identify the charred bodies in their firebombed van

    • Australian surfers Dean Lucas and Adam Coleman are missing in Mexico
    • The two men, both 33, were last seen Friday, November 20, buying a map
    • Their girlfriends hope to provide Mexican authorities with DNA samples
    • Mr Lucas’ girlfriend, Josie Cox, arrived in Mexico with his dental records
    • While Mr Coleman’s girlfriend, Andrea Gomez, has pieces of his dreadlocks
    • Mexican authorities located the van the two Australian men were driving
    • Local media outlets have reported the discovery of the burnt campervan 

    Mr Lucas’ girlfriend, Josie Cox, arrived in Mexico on Sunday before she revealed her boyfriend was planning to propose.

    Mr Coleman’s girlfriend, Andrea Gomez, said Ms Cox brought Mr Lucas’ dental records with her.

    Josie Cox, Dean Lucas's girlfriend, has flown to Mexico to try and help find him and Adam Coleman. She arrived on Sunday with his dental records

    Mr Coleman's girlfriend, Andrea Gomez (right with her boyfriend), has 'pieces of his dreadlocks' to help authorities identify if one of the bodies found in a burnt-out campervan found in Navolato belongs to her partner

    Mexican news outlets have reported finding a burnt Chevy on the side of a road with two bodies inside

    Along with ‘pieces of dreadlocks’ given to Ms Gomez by her partner, the pair hoped authorities would be able to confirm whether or not the bodies found were those of their loved ones.

    ‘Everything points to it being them because the van matches, it had a bicycle. But nothing is confirmed yet,’ Ms Gomez said.

    At first, Ms Gomez and Ms Cox had wanted to travel to the Sinaloa capital of Culiacan on Monday with the items for DNA testing, but now they would travel to Mexico City to make contact with the Australian Embassy.

    Mr Lucas and Mr Coleman, from Golden Bay – an outer southern suburb of Perth, were reported missing after they organised ‘solid plans and reservations’ to be in Guadalajara, Mexico by November 21, but failed to arrive.

    Mexican news outlets reported the discovery of a burnt caravan containing two bodies as the families of the two men were informed their vehicle had been found and a ‘tragic event [had] occurred’.

    Family are currently travelling to Mexico and Ms Cox revealed on Sunday night Mr Lucas was going to ask her to marry him.

    Dean Lucas (left) and Adam Coleman (right) from Western Australia went missing while driving through Mexico in a blue and white Chevy

    Ms Cox revealed that Mr Lucas had been planning to propose to her before he went missing

    Pictured is Mr Coleman with his girlfriend Andrea Gomez, who had been planning to meet with him soon

    The Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade has confirmed the van has been found in Mexico 

    Mexican authorities are yet to identify the bodies who were found in a destroyed Chevy in Navolato, one of the most dangerous areas in Mexico, about 10.30pm.

    Sinaloa, home of the powerful cartel led by fugitive drug lord Joaquin ‘El Chapo’ Guzman, stretches down Mexico’s Pacific coast and would be on the route of most road trips to Guadalajara from western Canada.

    Ms Cox has taken to social media appealing for any information that may help find the Australian men who were last seen in the coastal town of Los Mochis, with a witness saying the pair were buying a map.

    The Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade released a statement on the missing surfers confirming their van has been located in Mexico.

    Mr Lucas' girlfriend Josie Cox earlier posted on Facebook that their families were devastated to learn local authorities had officially classed the pair as missing. Pictured is Mr Coleman

    Ms Cox said the men had 'solid plans and reservations' to be at Guadalajara by November 21, but never arrived. Pictured is her boyfriend Mr Lucas

    Ms Cox said the men had ‘solid plans and reservations’ to be at Guadalajara by November 21, but never arrived. Pictured is her boyfriend Mr Lucas

    A social media campaign has been launched to find two West Australian surfers. Above is Mr Lucas (left)

    Adam Coleman pictured with his girlfriend, Josie Cox

     Ms Cox is pictured here with Mr Lucas during various travels the pair took together

    ‘Dean and Adam were travelling in a van, departing from Topolobampa on Friday 20 November to Guadalajara but did not arrive on their scheduled date,’ the statement said.

    ‘The families and partners are aware the van in which they were traveling has been located by Mexican authorities and that a tragic event has occurred.

    ‘The families hold deep fears for the safety of their sons but stress that they are still waiting for details to be confirmed.’

    The local media publications have also translated Ms Cox’s plea for help in to Spanish in a bid to help try and find the pair.

    ‘The last confirmed siting [sic] was disembarking the ferry from Cabo to Topolobampa on Friday 20th November at 10pm. They were supposed to drive to Guadalajara after this, and never arrived,’ Ms Cox wrote on Facebook.

    Mr Lucas has also booked flights to the U.K. from Los Angeles within three days but there is now doubt whether he will be catching the flight.

    Family members of the pair are heading to Mexico as they await confirmation 

    The pair had ‘solid plans and reservations’ to be in Guadalajara, Mexico but never arrived 

    ‘They are very keen and confident surfers from Australia and may have gone in search of waves in remote villages close by. We suspect they free camped somewhere on route from Topolobampo to Guadalajara overnight.,

    ‘Their family and I are devastated and would kindly urge that you share this as far as you can and on any relevant social media sites or pages to help us find our boys.’

    Ms Cox’s recent update on the search also suggested there is devastating news.

    ‘We’d like to update everyone to announce we have had some distressing developments which we have not yet had confirmed.

    They were last seen buying a map by a witness in the Mexican coastal city of Los Mochis

    The keen surfers from Golden Bay, an outer southern suburb of Perth have not made contact with their families for over a week

    The van has a distinct red door on the back with the registration plates BSN - 2713

    ‘We would appreciate any updates on information if you know anyone that has any, but ask that the Lucas and Coleman family have some privacy at this time,’ she wrote on Facebook.

    Another friend of the pair also posted images of the men on social media while also suggesting their phones were stolen.

    ‘They have been driving through Mexico in this van and it’s been reported that Adam’s phone is now being used by someone else.

    ‘He is usually in regular contact with his mother and girlfriend so this is very out of character for him,’ she wrote.

    A friend of the pair has suggested that Adam Coleman's phone is being used by another person

    Local media organisations have also released photos of the pair in a bid to find any information that may help 

    In two hours a fundraising page for the pair's family members has raised over $4,000

     In two hours a fundraising page for the pair’s family members has raised over $4,000

    A gofundme fundraising page has also been set up to raise money for family members to help them travel to Mexico and continue their search for the pair.

    In nine hours 129 people have donated to the fundraising page raising over $16,000.

    ‘We are currently raising funds to help support both families in getting over to Mexico and bringing Dean and Adam back home to WA safely. any contributions is greatly appreciated,’ wrote the organiser of the page.

    A social media campaign has also been launched to help find the pair with the public using #FindDeanandAdam to share images and news of the men.

    The last confirmed siting was disembarking the ferry from Cabo to Topolobampa on Friday 20th November at 10pm

    Social media is reposting images of the Australians in hopes of finding any information about their disappearance

    Social media is reposting images of the Australians in hopes of finding any information about their disappearance

    A close friend's recent Facebook post reveals the family has received 'distressing developments' and their families are awaiting confirmation

    A close friend’s recent Facebook post reveals the family has received ‘distressing developments’ and their families are awaiting confirmation

Music promoter Andrew McManus is one of five men who have been arrested over an alleged cocaine smuggling ring.


Andrew McManus, promoter to stars including Aerosmith, Laura Dundovic and KISS, arrested in international cocaine ring bust… after police trace $700,000 in cash he claimed was ‘for a Lenny Kravitz concert’

  • Music promoter Andrew McManus was arrested and charged by police
  • It is alleged the 54-year-old was part of an international drug trafficking ring
  • The investigation began when $702,000 was found in a hotel room in 2011
  • McManus claimed the money was payment for a Lenny Kravitz concert 

A prominent Australian music promoter is one of five men who have been arrested over an alleged cocaine smuggling ring.

A four-year joint investigation between NSW Police and the United States’ FBI led to the arrests of the group of men.

Detectives arrested three men in Sydney on Thursday night while a fourth man – 54-year-old music promoter Andrew McManus  – was arrested at Melbourne Airport, the Sydney Morning Herald reported.

Music promoter Andrew McManus has been arrested as part of an alleged international drug trafficking ring 

 Music promoter Andrew McManus has been arrested as part of an alleged international drug trafficking ring

It has also been reported the detained Sydney men were crime figure Craig Haeusler, Kings Cross solicitor Michael Croke and Auburn pastry shop owner Zeki Atilgan.

McManus has been charged with perverting the course of justice, two counts of intention to defraud by false or misleading statement and knowingly participating in a criminal group.

A fifth man was arrested in the US by the FBI for drug offences and money laundering, NSW Police said in a statement.

US businessman Owen Hanson Jr was arrested while playing golf in San Diego, the Herald reported.

McManus and Miss Universe Australia 2008 Laura Dundovic in 2008

Andrew McManus and music legend Stevie Nicks pose at The Melbourne Cup in 2005

McManus (left with Laura Dundovic and right with Stevie Nicks) was arrested along with crime figure Craig Haeusler, Kings Cross solicitor Michael Croke and Auburn pastry shop owner Zeki Atilgan

Andrew McManus has been responsible for bringing Aerosmith, KISS, Lenny Kravitz and Chris Isaak (pictured above with McManus in 2008) to Australia

 Andrew McManus has been responsible for bringing Aerosmith, KISS, Lenny Kravitz and Chris Isaak (pictured above with McManus in 2008) to Australia

He was charged with perverting the course of justice, two counts of intention to defraud by false or misleading statement and knowingly participating in a criminal group

NSW detectives started investigating the alleged syndicate in August 2011 after a bag of $702,000 in cash was found in a man’s Sydney hotel room.

WHO IS ANDREW MCMANUS?

Andrew McManus, who owns McManus Entertainment, has been responsible for bringing Aerosmith, KISS and Lenny Kravitz to Australia.

He was forced to declare bankruptcy when the ATO discovered he had a $2.4 million tax debt after he was left $4.2 million out of pocket when deals and tours fell through.

McManus had to sell off his fleet of luxury cars and extensive property portfolio to cover his substantial debts.

The music promoter made headlines again back in 2011 when he was linked to a bag of $702,000 in cash that he claimed was payment for a Lenny Kravitz concert.

Four years later, he was arrested for his alleged part in a international cocaine ring, along with three Sydney men and a US citizen.

A court case was brought against NSW Police for the return of the cash when McManus claimed the bag was his and the money was payment for a Lenny Kravitz concert when he toured Australia.

But the police won and in late 2014 conducted raids in Sydney and Victoria, which netted $68,000 cash, drugs, steroids, documents and electronic equipment.

The operation also uncovered information regarding the alleged importation of 300kg of cocaine from Mexico to Australia via the US.

Since then, police have been investigating alleged drug trafficking between Mexico, the US and Australia, and associated money laundering.

Australian Crime Commission NSW manager Warren Gray said ‘investigations like this one affirm the effectiveness of “following the money'”‘.

NSW Police have charged a 55-year-old man with perverting the course of justice, intention to defraud by false or misleading statement and knowingly participating in a criminal group.

A 65-year-old has been charged with perverting the course of justice, three counts of intention to defraud by false or misleading statement and knowingly participating in a criminal group.

A 32-year-old man was charged with two counts of money laundering.

NSW detectives started investigating the alleged syndicate in August 2011 after a bag of $702,000 in cash was found in a man's Sydney hotel room. Above is one of the three Sydney men being arrested on ThursdayNSW detectives started investigating the alleged syndicate in August 2011 after a bag of $702,000 in cash was found in a man’s Sydney hotel room. Above is one of the three Sydney men being arrested on Thursday

The trio have been charged with money laundering, perverting the course of justice, intention to defraud by false or misleading statement and knowingly participating in a criminal group

Police raided the homes of three men in Kellyville, Miranda, and Sydney CBD following the extensive investigationPolice raided the homes of three men in Kellyville, Miranda, and Sydney CBD following the extensive investigation

The group of men have been bailed to appear at Sydney courts at later dates. NSW Police are also seeking to extradite a US citizenThe group of men have been bailed to appear at Sydney courts at later dates. NSW Police are also seeking to extradite a US citizen

The group of men have been bailed to appear at Sydney courts at later dates.

NSW Police is seeking the extradition of a 33-year-old US citizen to Sydney on arrest warrants for money laundering, perverting the course of justice and intent to defraud by false or misleading statement, as well as an additional charge of drug supply of a large commercial quantity.

Detectives from the Organised Crime Squad are currently in San Diego, California, working with the FBI.

A number of search warrants were executed, with officers seizing cash, gold, silver, cannabis and documentation.


Drug trafficking, money laundering bust sees five men, including Melbourne music promoter, arrested in joint NSW Police-FBI investigation

Updated about 2 hours ago

Music promoter Andrew McManus was arrested in Melbourne last night. (Getty Images: Kristian Dowling)

Five men, including Melbourne music promoter Andrew McManus, have been arrested following a joint FBI and New South Wales police investigation into international drug trafficking and money laundering.

An investigation was launched after police seized more than $700,000 from a man at a Sydney hotel in 2011.

NSW Police faced legal action for the return of the money, with a claim being made that it was payment for an international band who had toured Australia, but the case was thrown out of the Supreme Court and investigations continued.

Last year, New South Wales and Victoria police raided five properties, seizing more than $68,000 in cash and steroids.

Detectives say they also uncovered the importation of 300 kilograms of cocaine from Mexico to Australia, via the United States.

Following a joint operation with the FBI in San Diego, California, police last night arrested McManus, 54, in Melbourne.

McManus’ promotion companies have brought a number of high-profile entertainers to Australia, including Kiss, Mötley Crüe and Stevie Nicks.

A 65-year-old Sydney solicitor and two other New South Wales men were also charged.

Subsequent searches at a home in Kellyville, in Sydney’s north-west, uncovered cash, steroids and cannabis.

New South Wales Police are also trying to extradite US citizen Owen Hanson, 33, to Sydney so he can be charged.

He was arrested by FBI agents in the parking lot of a golf course in near San Diego, California, where he remains in custody on US federal drug charges, according to a statement from the FBI.

“The commitment made by the detectives and others involved in this investigation has been outstanding — they never lost focus on the job at hand,” commander of the Organised Crime Squad, Detective Superintendent Scott Cook, said in a statement.

“As recent investigations have shown, it is now clear that organised syndicates impacting NSW are often transnational in nature.

“Whilst this presents us with challenges, those who undertake these activities need to understand that being outside the jurisdiction will not save you.”

Australian Crime Commission state manager NSW Warren Gray said that, in this instance, “following the money” led to the discovery of criminal activity.

“The collaborative work between NSW Police and the FBI, and multiple partner agencies, is highly commendable and this outcome is a great result for the Australian community,” he said.

theage.com.au

Andrew McManus at centre of storm

Kate McClymont

Big business: Andrew McManus in his office.Big business: Andrew McManus in his office. Photo: Teagan Glenane FCN

Controversial music promoter Andrew McManus has unwittingly revealed an important career lesson to tax evaders: if you are going to boast about ripping off the Australian Tax Office, don’t confide in the police.

His bizarre admission emerged last week in a court case involving the promoter, a bag full of cash, international rock acts including Fleetwood Mac and Lenny Kravitz and crime figures from Australia and the US.

“I’m not a dickhead but… if this went to the ATO, I’d be cooked again.”  

Andrew McManus

During an investigation into the source of the $702,000 cash found in a Sydney hotel room in 2011, McManus claimed the money was his. He boasted to police if they came round to his house “right now” they would find a safe with “600 large sittin’ in it”.

Legends: International rock act Fleetwood Mac.Legends: International rock act Fleetwood Mac.

When the police asked about the source of the money, he said, “This isn’t going anywhere?” He then offered that the “600 large” came from a Lenny Kravitz tour.

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 He told police that he used 20 crew members to “sneak” the cash in from New Zealand.

“I’m not a dickhead but… if this went to the ATO, I’d be cooked again,” he volunteered.

Legal fight: Sean Carolan at the Supreme Court in Sydney.Legal fight: Sean Carolan at the Supreme Court in Sydney. Photo: Photo: Janie Barrett

Documents tendered during a recent battle in the NSW Supreme Court over the money have revealed that McManus also accepted $450,000 in cash from the outlaw Perth bikie gang, the Coffin Cheaters.

He also admitted to police that he withheld funds from rock groups including international stars Fleetwood Mac.

McManus also confided to police about the financial fallout from his involvement in the Melbourne Storm salary cap scandal.

The saga of the suitcase full of cash had its origins in May 2011 when McManus was staying at the luxurious InterContinental hotel in Macquarie Street, a short walk from Sydney’s Circular Quay.

In his hotel room he had a number of plastic shopping bags crammed with $10,000 bundles of cash totalling $702,000. His long-time friend and associate Craig Haeusler emptied the bags into a suitcase.

Haeusler, a drug kingpin who served five years in jail for running a multi-million dollar drug ring supplying methamphetamines to Sydney’s eastern suburbs, then gave the money to a young American, Owen Hanson jnr.

Haeusler told police he had been introduced to Hanson by a Chinese gambling identity and that the pair had bet on the NFL in America.

Hanson, who moved hotels every few days, was nicknamed “Dispose” by his Australian friends because of his propensity to dispose of pre-paid mobile phones.

Haeusler later told police that McManus was repaying Hanson who had  stumped up the deposit McManus needed for a ZZ Top tour.

The suitcase of cash was then hidden by Hanson in the ceiling of a rented apartment in Kent Street for three months. In August he handed the suitcase of cash to his personal trainer, Sean Carolan.

On August 11, 2011, police received an anonymous tip-off that the occupant of room 3026 in the Hilton Hotel had a gun. The occupant, Carolan, a former cage fighter and racehorse trainer turned personal trainer, didn’t have a gun — but he did have a black suitcase containing McManus’s $702,000, which the police seized.

Carolan’s subsequent legal fight to recover the money has brought to light a bizarre series of events.

On the night police seized the cash, Carolan said he was merely minding the money for Hanson, who didn’t want to lose any more at the casino.

CCTV footage from Star City casino obtained by the police shows earlier that day Carolan and Hanson were in a heated conversation with Robert Cipriani, a well-known American high roller who calls himself Robin Hood 702 (702 is the telephone code for Las Vegas).

Police records note that Cipriani “is well known to the casino and is currently of interest to the Australian Federal Police”.

The day after the cash was seized, Cipriani left for Los Angeles.

During the investigation into the suitcase, police interviewed Hanson by videolink from the Beverly Hills police station in Los Angeles. “Do you want me to tell you the, the full story of how basically this money was laundered…?” Hanson offered.

He said the cash had come from McManus but, contrary to Carolan’s initial version, Hanson claimed he had given the money to Carolan to invest in Carolan’s weight loss clinic.

As well as expressing concern at Hanson’s use of the word “laundered”, Justice Richard Button noted in his judgment on Monday, “There is no satisfactory explanation why Mr Hanson would invest hundreds of thousands of dollars in cash in the business concept of a personal trainer who resided in a foreign country and whom he had known for no more than several weeks.”

Justice Richard Button refused to hand the $702,000 back to Carolan, saying he was not convinced he was “lawfully” entitled to the money.

Carolan was ordered to pay the police costs.

When he was interviewed by police in April 2012, McManus told them the money was his. “It’s pretty obvious though. I gave someone 700 large, and you’ve found someone with 700 large. It’s my 700 large.”

McManus told the police that the cash was part of a business deal where he was repaying the money to Hanson, who had lent him cash as a deposit for a ZZ Top tour but now he wanted it back to fund a Lenny Kravitz tour.

“In essence, I delivered back 700 grand I now need to borrow it again. As quickly as possible,” he said.

He also said; “It’s not the proceeds of crime, it’s the [proceeds] of Andrew McManus.”

McManus made remarkable admissions during his record of interview with police. He has since claimed he was under the influence of morphine  and alcohol at the time.

The rock promoter volunteered to police that he had been “under suspicion by the NRL, for making player payments to rugby league players”.

This was a reference to the Melbourne Storm salary cap scandal in 2010 when it was revealed that McManus had facilitated extra payments to Storm players including Greg Inglis, Cameron Smith and Billy Slater.

His company, Andrew McManus Presents, would bill the Storm for “promotional” events. The money would be then be channelled by McManus’s company through to several Storm players.

The Storm were later stripped of their points and previous premiership titles.

Neither the players nor McManus were accused of any wrongdoing but McManus told the police of the fallout which included the Australian Tax Office going through him like a dose of salts.

“Although I did make tax payments on each player payment, I never actually got them to sign a full stat dec. So, of those players, they decided that they would fine me…between 30 per cent and the 49 per cent.”

He said he had to pay the ATO $120,000 per player, which totalled $2.4 million. “It crushed my company…Andrew McManus Presents International,” he told police.

Because of his ensuing financial difficulties he said he used friends and associates to help fund tours. McManus mentioned that Liberal powerbroker Michael Kroger and his brother Andrew had invested in his concert tours.

He said on five or six occasion, Michael Kroger had “put cash in and then I’ll, you know, fold it out.”

A spokesman for Michael Kroger said it was “a standard financial arrangement”.

McManus also boasted of withholding cash ticket sales from bands such as Fleetwood Mac. “I sold over $700,000 in cash tickets, because people wanted the best tickets, they come to the office, they ring up or email.”

“I’m not sharing it with the band…the cash stays in Andrew McManus’s pocket,” he told police.

McManus also told the police that he had accepted $450,000 in cash from the Coffin Cheaters, an outlaw motor cycle gang who were promoting the Perth leg of the ZZ Top tour.

During his police interview, McManus was accompanied by his lawyer and former partner in a Sydney nightclub, Michael Croke.

Croke, who represented Haeusler in his drug trial, also acted for McManus, Hanson, Haeusler and finally Carolan in the latter’s unsuccessful attempt to have the money returned.

During the case, Haeusler was pacing up and down the corridor outside the Supreme Court in Sydney.

McManus declined to comment for this story. He has issued a media release suggesting revelations about the suitcase and the cash were “gutter journalism by a bottom feeder” and that the articles had been written under “the protection of impossible deformation (sic) laws.”

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