The ICAC is investigating corruption allegations concerning Emman Sharobeem for rorting hundreds of thousands of dollars on herself


The ICAC is investigating corruption allegations concerning Emman Sharobeem, the former CEO of the Immigrant Women’s Health Service(IWHS) and the Non-English Speaking Housing Women’s Scheme Inc (NESH).

The allegations include that Ms Sharobeem dishonestly exercised her official functions as IWHS CEO by: between 1 July 2009 and 17 February 2016, submitting invoices for reimbursement for goods and services to which she was not entitled and using an IWHS credit card to pay for personal expenses; between 2014 and 2015 submitting, and authorising payment by IWHS of, false invoices for facilitation fees and other services to herself and other persons to which they were not entitled; between 2011 and 2015, submitting, and authorising payment of, invoices by the IWHS for the renovation of her property in Fairfield; and between 2012 and 2014, falsifying IWHS statistics to NSW Health.

Ms Sharobeem is also alleged to have dishonestly exercised her official functions between 2006 and 2016 by claiming to be a psychologist holding two PhD degrees and a masters degree, and further using those qualifications to treat IWHS clients and gain promotion to the position of CEO of the IWHS and the NESH. As NESH CEO, Ms Sharobeem is alleged to have dishonestly exercised her official functions between 17 December 2013 and 23 November 2015 by authorising payments from NESH to be made to her own account, to which she was not entitled.

Between March 2011 and November 2016, Ms Sharobeem is also alleged to have fraudulently obtained and retained appointment as a Board member of the Community Relations Commission (now Multicultural NSW) and the Anti-Discrimination Board (now part of the Department of Justice) by using false academic qualifications.

The IWHS was a not-for-profit non-government organisation (NGO) women’s health service, primarily funded by NSW Health via South West Sydney Local Health District, while the NESH  was a not-for-profit NGO contracted and funded by the Department of Family and Community Services to provide affordable housing to women and children. In her capacity as CEO, Ms Sharobeem was a public official for the purposes of the Independent Commission Against Corruption Act 1988.

What so obvious (Did you see her on the news grabs last night going into ICAC)

Looked a different woman. Facelifts, liposuction, new teeth, body shaping, tens of thousands on designer handbags etc.

Can we see where this is going? She thought she was as entitled as some of the biggest over the top diva women in the poor countries who DESERVE all this material bullshit way pretending to stand up the poor and vulnerable women.

How disgusted must they be when to let’s say they asked her for help with a bill or their hair falling out from stress.

IT was a BIG NO.

While she got new teeth, got lipo, got skinny, wore the best, dined and the best. Even sold the property of the agency and kept around $600,000 profit to herself.

Flew all over the world, wearing clothes way beyond her means. I just want to be sick at the gall of this bitch. Regards Robbo

‘Why are you torturing me?’ Eman Sharobeem lashes out over ICAC psychology claim

Michael Evans

  • Michael Evans

Former Australian of the Year finalist Eman Sharobeem has lashed out at a public inquiry into claims she illegally practiced as a psychologist, saying she was being “tortured”.

Under heavy questioning from counsel assisting the Independent Commission Against Corruption, Ramesh Rajalingam, about client booking lists for the Immigrant Women’s Health Service, Ms Sharobeem insisted she did not treat anyone.

She was shown video of an appearance on SBS television program Insight and played audio from two ABC Radio National programs in which she claimed to be a psychologist. 

The commission has also been shown patient referrals from doctors and religious figures who sent people to her for treatment.

“You told people you were a psychologist?”

“No.”

“Do you accept a lot of people knew you as a psychologist?”

“How can I treat them if I’m not a psychologist? When I say in the media I’m a psychologist that’s shorthand for the honorary doctorate I received,” Ms Sharobeem said.

 

 

“Why are you torturing me to that extent? Sir, I did not treat anyone.”

Ms. Sharobeem also lashed out over questions concerning the execution of a search warrant at her home.

“I was invaded. You took everything I had,” she said.

The ICAC has alleged that Ms. Sharobeem holds no qualifications to practice as a psychologist despite her claims to hold a Ph.D. in psychology.

Ms. Sharobeem has given evidence she was given an honorary doctorate by the American University in Cairo but that evidence of it was burnt in a fire during the Arab Spring of 2012. 

She has denied she ever practiced as a psychologist. She has accepted she never completed psychology studies.

Ms. Sharobeem later apologized for her outburst, saying: “My apology for being heated.”


 

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Clive Palmer media adviser Andrew Crook charged over alleged kidnap of National Australia Bank executive


By the National Reporting Team’s Mark Solomons and Mark Willacy – exclusive

Fri 19 Dec 2014, 4:59pm

Clive Palmer‘s media adviser and confidant Andrew Crook has been granted bail after facing court charged over the alleged kidnapping of a National Australia Bank executive on an Indonesian island.

Crook was arrested this morning during police raids on properties in Brisbane and on the Gold Coast.

As part of the same operation, police from the state’s anti-bikie taskforce arrested Mick Featherstone, a Gold Coast private investigator and former senior detective at the centre of a year-long probe by Queensland‘s Crime and Corruption Commission into money laundering and police corruption.

Police also issued a warrant for the arrest of multi-millionaire property developer and former Sydney Swans , who lives in Bali.

Do you know more about this story? Email investigations@abc.net.au

Crook and Featherstone were held during morning raids at addresses in the Brisbane suburb of New Farm and Upper Coomera on the Gold Coast.

Crook was then taken to his Brisbane CBD office where police carried out further searches.

Officers also raided another Brisbane premises and seized documents.

On Friday afternoon Crook and Featherstone faced court charged with attempting to pervert the course of justice, retaliation against a witness and attempted fraud against NAB.

Crook was bailed on conditions including that he surrender his passport and does not go within 100 metres of the NAB’s Southport branch.

The ABC understands Queensland Police will allege Crook and Mr Smith were involved in a January 2013 attempt to coerce a witness in a $70 million civil case involving Mr Smith to recant his evidence, using subterfuge and threats of violence.

Queensland Police say the charges stem from an elaborate scheme which police will allege was planned partly in Queensland. Section 12 of the Queensland Criminal Code allows for prosecutions for offences overseas where they would be considered crimes in Australia.

Police have been investigating claims Crook and Mr Smith lured the witness, an employee of the National Australia Bank, to Singapore and on to Batam Island in Indonesia using the pretence of a possible job offer from Clive Palmer.

It will be alleged that once on Batam Island, the witness was strip-searched, threatened and forced to make a statement recanting his evidence.

Clive Palmer calls raids a ‘black day for Australia’

Mr Palmer is not thought to have had any involvement in, or knowledge of the plot.

The federal MP arrived at Crook’s office during the raid and said he knew nothing of the allegations.

But he suggested the police actions could be politically motivated.

“I don’t know very much other than to say that Crook Media and Andrew Crook are responsible for all our media in Australia, was responsible for the Palmer United Party winning the last federal election,” he said.

“And of course, the LNP, the Liberal Government – Campbell Newman and Tony Abbott – don’t like the opposition we’ve been giving them in the Senate, they don’t like that sort of thing.

“I think this is a black day for Australia if any of this, which I don’t know anything about at the moment, has anything to do with political freedom in this country.

“I think it’s very important that there’s freedom of speech in Australia, that there’s diversity of opinion. I’m personally very concerned because Mr Crook is our media adviser and if they wanted to attack me or our party they can do that.”

Brisbane-based Crook has been Mr Palmer’s media adviser and spokesman since before the tycoon entered politics.

Since becoming a federal MP, Mr Palmer has retained the services of Crook and his PR firm, Crook Media, to handle his political media relations.

Clive Palmer chats with Andrew Crook Photo: Mr Crook has been Mr Palmer’s media adviser and spokesman since before the tycoon entered politics. (AAP: Dave Hunt)

Mr Smith made his fortune in the tourism industry after his AFL career.

Since 2009 he has been embroiled in legal action against the National Australia Bank, claiming the bank caused him to lose $70 million at the height of the global financial crisis.

He began building the biggest mansion on the Gold Coast, on Hedges Avenue at Mermaid Beach, but was later forced to sell it unfinished and at a loss.

Mr Smith then shifted his businesses to Bali, where he has developed luxury holiday accommodation. He also has interests in New Zealand and has re-invested in Gold Coast real estate in the past couple of years.

It is understood detectives from the Queensland police anti-bikie taskforce Maxima stumbled on evidence of the alleged January 2013 plot earlier this year while investigating Featherstone and his links to bikies, to former and serving police officers and his involvement with online betting syndicates on the Gold Coast.

The ABC revealed in September that Featherstone was the focus of a joint Maxima and Crime and Corruption Commission probe described as a “priority” investigation by CCC chairman Ken Levy.

In a parallel, four-month investigation, the ABC uncovered evidence Featherstone had for almost 10 years been involved in setting up and operating online betting syndicates alleged to have defrauded thousands of people across Australia of millions of dollars.

Queensland’s Office of Fair Trading (QOFT) this week renewed Featherstone’s private investigator’s licence, which had expired in October. It also renewed the licence held by his PI firm, Phoenix Global.

The office of Queensland Attorney-General Jarrod Bleijie, which oversees the QOFT, told the ABC it had conducted the required criminal history checks and could find no reason to deny Featherstone or his firm a licence.

AFL player Trent Dumont -North Melbourne Kangaroos footballer allegedly Robs Taxi Driver-Another hero


So the AFL media are protecting another loser! This bloke Trent Dumont… What a tool, a grub, and another loser who had no idea how good he had it! Apparently thumped the driver and robbed him of his cash!

How did Trent Dumont get himself into this, not a good look
How did Trent Dumont get himself into this, not a good look is it

North Melbourne player under police investigation

October 28, 2014 – 4:02PM

A North Melbourne player is under police investigation for an alleged robbery of a taxi driver in South Australia.

The incident reportedly happened in the early hours of Sunday October 12.

The player was one of two men involved in the incident where the driver was allegedly threatened and money was stolen.

In a statement issued on Tuesday afternoon, the Kangaroos said: “The North Melbourne Football Club can confirm that a member of its playing list is currently assisting South Australian Police in relation to an incident that is alleged to have occurred in South Australia earlier this month.

“As this is a matter of ongoing police inquiry, no further comment will be made by the club until it is in a position to do so.”


North Melbourne AFL player investigated over taxi incident

Posted about an hour agoTue 28 Oct 2014, 6:07pm

The AFL has confirmed a North Melbourne player is one of two men under police investigation over the alleged robbery of a taxi driver in South Australia.

Police have not yet named the player.

He and another man were alleged to have threatened the driver in the early hours of October 12.

The pair was alleged to have assaulted the driver when he refused their demands, stolen his money and fled the scene.

Police said the taxi driver was not seriously hurt.

The club said the man was a member of the playing list and was “currently assisting South Australian Police” in relation to the incident.

“As this is a matter of ongoing police inquiry, no further comment will be made by the club until it is in a position to do so,” North Melbourne said in a statement.


North Melbourne’s Trent Dumont charged over alleged robbery of taxi driver

October 28, 2014 – 4:02PM

North Melbourne player Trent Dumont has been charged over an alleged robbery of a taxi driver in South Australia earlier this month.

The club confirmed on Tuesday that 19-year-old Dumont, who has yet to play a game for the club, was the player who had been arrested by South Australian police.

Dumont was one of two men involved in an incident that reportedly happened on the morning of October 12 in which a taxi driver was allegedly threatened before money was stolen.

Dumont and a second man, also aged 19, have been bailed and will appear in South Australia’s Holden Hill Magistrates Court late next month.

In a statement issued on Tuesday afternoon, the Kangaroos said: “As this is a matter of ongoing police enquiry, no further comment will be made by the club until it is in a position to do so.”

Police released CCTV footage on Monday of two men inside the cab and the second man was arrested later that evening after contacting authorities.

Further enquiries on Tuesday led to Dumont’s arrest.

Hailing from South Australia, the 19-year-old was North Melbourne’s second selection in the 2013 national draft and was tipped to make his senior debut next year.

Six SA Cops arrested on theft and abuse of public office charges by ICAC


6 Coppers in SA wouldn’t have been stealing the drugs  or property they bust in raids would they? Surely not, stay tuned!

Updated with the charges.I have the names of these officers who are supposed to upload the law but have chosen to not name them just YET.

Charges include:

  • A 53-year-old man from Darlington – abuse of public office and aggravated theft
  • A 43-year-old man from Aberfoyle Park – two counts of abuse of public office, two counts of theft, and property damage
  • A 38-year-old man from Woodcroft – two counts of abuse of public office, two counts of aggravated theft and property damage
  • A 33-year-old man from Camden Park – abuse of public office and aggravated theft
  • A 31-year-old woman from Sellicks Beach – abuse of public office, aggravated theft and property damage
  • A 27-year-old woman from Woodcroft – abuse of public office and aggravated theft.

ICAC investigation: Six Adelaide SAPOL police officers charged with theft, abuse of public office

http://cdn.newsapi.com.au/image/v1/external?url=http://content6.video.news.com.au/RjcWoycTpSVlBQNMN88DLQj9OVeiSDYi/promo237443590&width=650&api_key=kq7wnrk4eun47vz9c5xuj3mc

POLICE will probe into the culture of the alleged offending of six officers arrested in the first major bust by the state’s new ICAC and its potential causes, Police Commissioner Gary Burns says.

Speaking outside the Police Association of SA annual delegates conference this morning, Mr Burns said a police department review of the Operation Mantle team where the officers worked would consider “the circumstances that may have fostered this type of behaviour to make sure it doesn’t happen again or in any other Mantle team”.

He said the seventh member of the team, a senior constable who has not faced charges, was also under investigation.

Mr Burns said the investigations of those officers, who have been suspended on full pay, may put cases they were working on under threat and also revealed the charges relating to property damage involved the destruction of potential police exhibits.

“That’s part of what we are looking at now — what the broader impact on policing is, in particular if these particular officers are involved in any arrests or reports that might be before the courts or going before the courts,” Mr Burns said.

He was unable to identify how many investigations it could affect.

Independent Commissioner Against Corruption, Bruce Lander, with Police Commissioner Gary
Independent Commissioner Against Corruption, Bruce Lander, with Police Commissioner Gary Burns announce the arrests.

Police Association of SA President Mark Carroll said the all members of the team are association members and should be considered innocent until proven guilty.

He said the association would be speaking with them over the coming days.

Earlier this morning, Mr Burns told 891 ABC radio the offending ranks as a “ten” on the scale of one to ten in its seriousness.

Despite considering the level of alleged corruption as low level, when asked on radio this morning to rank the seriousness of the alleged offending Mr Burns had no hesitation in putting it at the top of the scale.

“From a police department’s perspective I expect every police officer to act with honesty and integrity,” he told 891 ABC radio this morning.

How the country’s ICACs compare

How the country’s ICACs compare

“Talking to people within the department there’s quite a level of shock and horror about it.

“All I’m trying to say here is no form of corruption should be tolerated.

“From a police perspective this is something that really impacts on us particularly when it comes to public confidence.”

Mr Burns said he did not have a value of the goods allegedly taken by the officers charged.

He said while none of the goods could be considered high value there were greater issues at play for police.

Aguide to the investigation

A guide to the investigation

“The issue for us is that these officers used their authority to enter premises to investigate drug offences and while they were doing that the allegation is that they took this type of equipment and they had no authority to do that,” he said.

Mr Burns agreed with the suggestion that prosecutors would allege the officers charged “got sticky fingers”.

“Yes, that’s right,” he said.

Mr Burns and Independent Commissioner Against Corruption Bruce Lander announced the officers, including a sergeant, were charged on Monday with abuse of public office and stealing items including alcohol and electronics.

Mr Burns conceded the arrests would damage the public impression of SA Police.

The Sturt Police station.
The Sturt Police station.

“The allegations are very disappointing,” Mr Burns told The Advertiser today.

“Obviously every police officer in South Australia … will be concerned about this, because we work on reputation. “We need public confidence and public support.

“Any matter like this, where police officers are involved in criminality will always have an impact.” “It shouldn’t be seen as a reflection on the other 4500 police officers who go out and do their work on a daily basis to the best of their ability.”

He said a deeper probe of the Operation Mantle branch would be conducted.

The joint investigation was led by Mr Lander with assistance from SA Police’s Anti-Corruption Branch. The four men and two women will appear in court on December 19.

Mr Burns said “irregularities” were first raised with senior police in January and February this year.The ICAC was then alerted, as required by legislation, including interviews with the one member not arrested and former staff in the unit.

“This is isolated to a small group,” Mr Burns insisted. “We’ll be looking at what opportunities they had that formed this little subculture that they operated.”

The six officers face a total of 18 charges including abuse of public office, aggravated theft and property damage. They range in age from 27 to 53.

The group is not accused of onselling the allegedly stolen property.

Mr Lander, a former Federal Court judge, said he took charge of the inquiry to ensure that a person independent of the police force was probing the allegations.

Mr Lander said the accused officers had “let down” the force but he remained impressed by the professionalism of Anti-Corruption Branch officers he had worked with.

“I thought it appropriate that somebody independent of SAPOL head the investigation because of the allegations that have been made,” Mr Lander said.

“I’m satisfied with the integrity of the Anti-Corruption Branch. “I think they would have still carried out the investigation even if I had not been occupying the position I did.”

Mr Lander said he was “disappointed” by both the allegations and evidence uncovered.

Mr Burns said Operation Mantle was dispatched to deal with “low level” drug dealing and street crime. There was “no indication” the officers had stolen drugs, he said.

“It’s mainly in the lower-category items. Liquor, tools, some electronics,” Mr Burns said.

“The arrests today don’t finalise the investigation. This investigation will be ongoing.”

SA became the last state in the nation to set up an ICAC when the new watchdog became operational in September last year. This is its first case to result in arrests.

Mr Lander has previously revealed he had referred some allegations for prosecution.

Premier Jay Weatherill said he was disappointed by the allegations but said the arrests vindicated his move to set up an ICAC after having claimed the Labor leadership.

“Of course it’s awful when we see these breaches in public trust,” he said. “The public should have confidence the ICAC is doing its work and, where it finds these instances of breaches of public integrity, it’s rooting them out and bringing people to justice.

“The truth is there are still people that engage in opportunistic episodes of corruption, and we’re seeing that revealed. “It’s a good thing though (that) before these things take hold and become institutionalised that they’re able to be searched for, found and the people that have had these breaches of public trust brought to justice.

“I’m confident that it’s an isolated instance.”

The officers have been suspended from duty pending court proceedings.

He said one case under investigation related to the “conduct of a senior person in public administration’’ and local government was over-represented in complaints.

Of more than 900 complaints and reports made in the first year of the ICAC’s operation, less than 60 are under investigation for corruption-related offences after being assessed.

Mr Lander’s first report to State Parliament is expected to be tabled within weeks.


 

Six South Australian police officers will be charged as part of a joint investigation between the Independent Commissioner Against Corruption and SA Police Anti-Corruption Branch.

The six plain-clothes officers from the Sturt local service area in Adelaide’s southern suburbs are facing allegations of property-related theft and abuse of public office.

More details will be given at a news conference by ICAC Commissioner Bruce Lander and Police Commissioner Gary Burns.

Under Section 56 of ICAC legislation, Commissioner Lander has authorised police to publish and discuss details of the arrests.

The officers are part of Operation Mantle, which has been investigating drug-related crime.

South Australia’s ICAC formally started operating just over a year ago, with a range of strict and secretive legislative protocols.

It prompted Commissioner Lander to recommend late last year that the SA Government ease some secrecy provisions of the legislation.

Mr Lander said the ICAC Act had been over-engineered regarding confidentiality.

 

Michael Williamson jailed for at least five years over HSU fraud


Another greedy union official bites the dust, jailed for 5 years, that’s good, but not enough when one considers what he got up to. Filling his own and his families pockets with as much money as they could grab from the low paid workers this bastard was supposed to represent. Paying family owned companies hundreds of thousands of dollars for non existent or grossly over charging for work in the union.

I posted about his antics here several years ago along with Craig Thompson and the high living they felt was a free for all “Entitlement”

I will piece together my other posts and add them here shortly. Tip of the iceburg people…

Michael Williamson jailed for at least five years over HSU fraud

Updated 5 minutes ago

Former Health Services Union boss Michael Williamson has been sentenced to up to seven-and-a-half years in jail for fraud.

The New South Wales District Court was packed as sentencing Judge David Frearson described Williamson as “brazen and arrogant”.

The judge said Williamson was in a position of power when he defrauded the union of nearly $1 million.

The 60-year-old will be eligible for parole after serving five years in prison.

Williamson had been facing a possible 20 years in jail after pleading guilty to four charges including fraud and recruiting others to hinder a police investigation.

Prosecutors say Williamson, who was already on a salary of about $500,000, was motivated by greed.

The court has been told the former Australian Labor Party president submitted false invoices to the union from a company in his wife’s name.

Williamson’s lawyers say he has apologised and taken full responsibility for his actions, noting he has also suffered depression since his behaviour was exposed.

More to come.

Michael Williamson apologises for fraud as Health Services Union claims back funds

Updated Wed 16 Oct 2013

Disgraced former ALP president Michael Williamson has apologised to members of the Health Services Union (HSU) for his large-scale fraud, as the organisation moves to recoup millions of dollars.

Williamson appeared in Sydney’s Downing Centre District Court yesterday and admitted funnelling almost $1 million of union funds into companies he had an interest in as well as recruiting union members to help cover his tracks.

Williamson admitted claiming $340,000 for a business called Canme Services – which was registered in his wife Julieanne’s name – although no services were ever provided.

He also admitted to defrauding the union out of $600,000 through a consulting company called Access Focus.

The HSU says it has now finalised its civil claim against Williamson in the New South Wales Supreme Court.

He has been ordered to pay the union $5 million for breaches of his duty, overpayments of remuneration and negligence.

But it is unclear how much of the money will be recovered because Williamson has declared himself bankrupt.

Branch secretary Gerard Hayes says the union will still be able to claw back significant funds.

“We are able to withhold $1.1 million out of his superannuation and we are withholding $600,000 of unpaid entitlements,” he said.

“And very importantly as well a public apology will be issued to our members.”

Members of the HSU include some of the lowest-paid health workers such as cleaners and support staff.

In his letter of apology released by the union, Williamson urges members not to quit saying he accepts responsibility for what he did:

“I wish to place on record my sincere apology to all of you.

“You placed your trust in me when I was the general secretary and I abused that trust.

“I apologise unreservedly to all of you for my actions, which were not in keeping with the position I formerly held.

“I have agreed to assist the union in recovery actions against others, and will honour that agreement.

“The court will determine the penalty I am to receive, but it won’t remove the fact I have to live with this matter until the day I die.”

The HSU says the settlement was reached with the help of independent mediator, the former federal attorney-general Robert McClelland.

Mr Hayes says it is a line in the sand for the beleaguered union.

“This puts the last couple of years of turmoil to bed and it gets the union focused on what the union should be focused on,” he said.

Sentencing for Williamson begins in two weeks.

Former HSU boss Michael Williamson admits fraud offences

Updated Tue 15 Oct 2013

Former Australian Labor Party president Michael Williamson has pleaded guilty to funnelling almost $1 million from the Health Services Union (HSU) to businesses he had an interest in.

Williamson, who was arrested when detectives raided his Maroubra home in Sydney’s east last year, now faces jail for the offences.

The police investigation probed allegations of corruption during his time at the HSU aired by the union’s national secretary, Kathy Jackson.

He was accused of dozens of offences, including money laundering, dealing with the proceeds of crime and dishonestly dealing with hundreds of thousands of dollars of union funds.

Williamson appeared in Sydney’s Downing Centre Local Court this morning with his solicitor Vivian Evans.

The prosecutor told Chief Magistrate Graham Henson that several offences had been folded into four formal charges that Williamson would plead guilty to.

Williamson admitted funnelling nearly $340,000 into a business called Canme Services, which was registered in his wife Julieanne’s name.

Dozens of cheques were made out to Canme for services that were never provided to the union.

He also admitted to defrauding the union out of $600,000 through a consulting company called Access Focus.

It is believed Williamson received a massive windfall from the company due to inflated fees billed to the HSU.

The former unionist also pleaded guilty to fabricating invoices to cover his tracks in returns to the union in February last year.

Caught shredding evidence

The final guilty plea came in relation to recruiting of other union members to help destroy evidence and hinder a police investigation.

Last year, Williamson was caught trying to shred documents when he was confronted by the NSW Fraud Squad at the union offices in Sydney’s CBD.

He has pleaded guilty to recruiting Carron Gilleland to help him destroy evidence in the case.

‘Absolutely outrageous nepotism’

SMH investigative reporter Kate McClymont broke the story that led to the charges. She has told the ABC it is a case of “absolutely outrageous nepotism”.

“Especially when you think that the members of the HSU are hospital cleaners, orderlies, among the lowest paid unionists in the country,” she said.

McClymont is not surprised Williamson pleaded guilty, saying there were “certain pressures put on him” to do so.

“For instance, his son Christopher was one of those that was possibly facing criminal charges. So I think that there has been some argy bargy going on over the last couple of months that has led to his guilty plea today,” she said.

Listen to McClymont’s interview with the ABC.

Williamson stayed quiet through the proceedings today, with the prosecutor informing the court of the amended charge sheet.

He emerged from court speaking on a mobile phone and ignored the hive of media that had assembled.

Williamson resigned from the HSU late last year, less than two weeks after a leaked report into the union’s internal workings alleged he engaged in nepotism by funnelling union funds to himself and his family.

The report, by Ian Temby QC and Dennis Robertson, detailed allegations of multi-million-dollar instances of nepotism, maladministration and cronyism.

It said Williamson had a salary of almost $400,000 and alleged five members of his family were among the union’s best paid employees.

The magistrate committed Williamson to sentencing on October 28 in the District Court.

Police have previously said they expect to make more arrests in the case.

Closure for union members

The Australian Council of Trades Union (ACTU) says it hopes Williamson faces the full force of the law.

ACTU president Ged Kearney says he deserves whatever punishment he receives.

“Defrauding union members of their money is something that the union movement cannot abide and will not stand for,” she said.

“These offences are very serious and we’re very pleased that they will be dealt with properly by the criminal law.”

The New South Wales secretary of the HSU, Gerard Hayes, says today’s guilty pleas by Williamson will help bring closure for the union’s members.

“There are 30,000 victims in this matter,” he said.

“They needed closure and this certainly brings closure for them.”

Former Vic cop Trevor Adair stole cash during house raid-BUT avoids jail


Former Vic cop Trevor Adair stole cash during house raid BUT avoids jail…On the surface it appears one rule for some, and not for others. Can you imagine Joe Blow not doing time for stealing nearly 10 grand. Here we have a copper who was stressed…Poor bugger…We all are mate…At least he has NOT still got his $90,000 a year job. His cop buddies bragged about him in court, I do not believe it was a one-off. Fraud Squad hey…Go figure…

A FORMER Fraud Squad detective was today given a suspended jail term for stealing $9120 from a Prada purse during a police raid on a house in connection with suspected credit card scams.

Trevor Adair leaves the Melbourne Magistrates Court last week.

Trevor Adair, 42, had 22 years of otherwise unblemished service in the police force but had taken the cash in a spontaneous “moment of madness”, Melbourne Magistrates’ Court heard.

Magistrate Elizabeth Lambden, in imposing a three-month jail term wholly suspended for a year, said the case involved a serious breach of trust and would normally attract a prison sentence. So why isn’t he doing time?

Adair, who was highly-regarded by colleagues, pleaded guilty to the theft and said the pressure of child support payments may have been a factor.

Magistrate Lambden said she took account of Adair’s heightened anxiety and depression at the time of the offence, coupled with marital problems in the aftermath of his father’s death.

Adair was alone in a bedroom of the Glen Waverley home when he came across the money – which the woman whose purse it was claimed had been accrued as winnings at Crown Casino and from fruit picking earnings.

It was found in Adair’s backpack in a police car outside the property after the police raid in January and Adair made full admissions, the court heard.

Defence lawyer John Kelly said Adair should be given some sentence benefit because of his ready admissions, contrition and loss of livelihood, as well as consideration that most charges of this type were contested in court and Adair had been given separate legal advice he could fight the charge. No doubt pleaded because other stuff would of come up.

“It’s a pretty brave and lonely step to take (in pleading guilty),” Mr Kelly said.

Adair, who was earning $94,000 a year with the force and paying $9000 a year in child support, resigned from the police and now works as a labourer and bottle shop attendant, the court heard.

“It was a spur-of-the-moment brain fade… I don’t understand it,” Adair told Ethical Standards Department investigators. Greedy bastard thought he would get away with stealing from the enemy obviously, and she must of screamed out theft before they left.Good on her…

Trevor Adair has avoided jail for stealing $9120 from a Prada purse during a fraud squad raid.

 

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